Richard Reed Innocent Drinks Founder advice to Small business

(qlmbusinessnews.com via travelers.co.uk – – Sun, 10 Dec 2017) London, Uk – –

Innocent Drinks is known for its upbeat, playful brand. Founder Richard Reed offers his thoughts on why giving your brand a clear mission helps guide your business.

Focus on what you can control in business

“There are plenty of businesses that do well in the bad times, and there are plenty of businesses that do badly in the good times. The trick to staying positive is not to get too distracted by the external events you can’t control, and double down and focus on the things that you can.

“Ask yourself: have you got the right strategy? Are you effectively using that strategy? Are you attracting and retaining talent? Are you looking after your consumer better than the competition? And are you doing so in a meaningful way?”

Be prepared to adapt when you face challenges as a startup

“In 2008 when the credit crunch struck, we lost a third of our sales over a three-month period. We owed money to the banks, fruit prices went up due to a failure in world harvest, and the pound collapsed by 25%.

“Suddenly, consumers were saying our products were too expensive, but we were losing money on every single smoothie sold.

“We could have made our smoothies cheaper by reducing quality, but Innocent is about making the most natural, best quality drinks. Instead of changing our recipes, we resized our product to adapt to market pressures.”

Cut prices without compromise

“There are times when you’re going to need to make yourself cheaper because consumers have less money, but there will be a way of doing it which is in line with your brand.

“We knew there was absolutely no way we could compromise on quality, instead we sold smoothies in cartons of 750ml rather than 1litre. We made them smaller but we made the price smaller too – that actually turned the business around.”

Stay balanced through the highs and lows

“The bad times don’t last forever. They come in waves. Make sure you keep focused on the things that are important like looking after your consumer, making sure that the business is economically sound, and doing what you can to look after and attract talent.

“When you’re going through the good times, remember they’re going to end. Use the good times to build up a cushion of natural resource. It’s a classic thing, when the sun is shining, that’s when you start mending the roof – don’t wait until it’s raining.”

 

 

Tilman Fertitta the billionaire on how to be successful

 

Business Rockstars/Youtube

Tilman Fertitta, CEO of Landry’s Inc. – one of the nation’s largest restaurant corporations, sits down with Mark Lack. Tilman talks about owning Golden Nugget Casinos and Landry’s (worth over $3 billion) – the Houston-based restaurant and entertainment company that owns more than 500 properties and 40 brands of restaurants, including Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. and Morton’s The Steakhouse. Fertitta is the chairman and CEO. His CNBC show called “Billion Dollar Buyer” premiered in March 2016 and was renewed for a second season. He talks about going public, and then taking it back to private. He talks about growing his company to a billion dollar company. He gives great business advice and more!! He has 3 tips for anyone starting a business. Tilman is the man.

Two pharmaceutical firms to invest more than £1bn in the UK, creating 1,850 jobs.

Penn State

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk  – – Mon, 27 Nov 2017) London, Uk – –

Two pharmaceutical firms have said they will invest more than £1bn in the UK, creating about 1,850 jobs.

MSD, known as Merck in North America, will support a new research centre in London creating around 950 new posts.

Germany’s Qiagen will develop a genomics and diagnostics campus in Manchester, creating up to 800 jobs.

The government said these biotech deals illustrated confidence it its industrial strategy, the details of which it is publishing later.

Business Secretary Greg Clark said the investments represented “a huge vote of confidence” in the government’s plans.

“People don’t make the investments of this scale that are for the long term if they don’t have the confidence that we are building in this country a very attractive base,” he said.

  • Will the government’s economic medicine work?
  • Why isn’t the UK more productive?

He said the government’s white paper on industrial strategy would set out how the UK’s strengths in life sciences, financial services, advanced manufacturing and the creative industries would be maintained and enhanced.

The strategy comes just days after official forecasting body the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) announced an aggressive downgrade of its UK growth forecast.

The OBR concluded that a slowdown in the growth of productivity – or the value that each worker produces – since the financial crisis will persist for several more years.

The white paper will outline how “sector deals”, such as within the pharmaceutical industry, will link government funding and policy to investment from private firms.

MSD’s managing director in the UK and Ireland, Louise Houson, linked the company’s investment to the government’s approach to the economy: “This investment presents a major opportunity for us to work in collaboration with the UK government to build on the forward thinking and ambitious industrial strategy white paper being published.”

The chief executive of Qiagen, Peer Schatz, said the involvement of the University of Manchester, the NHS Trust and the UK government were “essential” to the partnership they are investing in.

Mr Clark said the UK’s decision to leave the EU meant the strategy was “even more important” and he said political commitments to limit immigration would not hamper the development of research related industries. He said the government would “make it easier for more scientists to come and work in the UK”.

Political parties and business groups have said that the solution to creating stronger growth and higher wages is more investment.

The industrial strategy is expected to outline similar partnerships to the MSD one with other private sector firms in the construction, artificial intelligence and automotive sectors.

The government said the deals would be “strategic and long-term partnerships”.

Here’s the idiot’s guide to how it’s supposed to work.

Pick an industry that the UK is already good at and needs investment.

Chuck in a bit of government money, cluster the right institutions around it, commit to provide the skills base and give them somewhere to try their new stuff.

That could mean faster trials for drugs in the NHS or using public roads to test driverless cars.

Hey presto – private investment ensues.

Some will see this as another example of government’s dodgy track record in “picking winners” – the government insists it is backing excellence.

Of course, all of these new initiatives are being born under the star sign of Brexit which makes them children of uncertainty.

Extra funding

 

The government has already pledged to invest an additional £80bn in research and development (R&D) over the next decade.

The additional funding is aimed at putting the UK’s investment in R&D on a par with other advanced nations.

Currently the UK spends 1.7% of its gross domestic product on R&D, much lower than the 2.4% average of developed countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

As part of its industrial strategy, the government is also expected to outline the main global trends which it believes the UK needs to tackle to revive its flat-lining productivity.

These are expected to include artificial intelligence, clean energy such as low carbon technologies, medical care for an ageing population and future mobility such as driverless cars and drone-delivered goods.

“More decisions about our economic future will be in our own hands and it is vital that we take them,” Mr Clark said.

The bespoke craftsmanship and unique design of Connor Wood bicycles

 

Source/Youtube

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 25 Nov 2017) London, Uk – –

The forerunner of the bicycle – the laufmaschine or running machine – bears only a passing resemblance to the pedal-bikes we know today.

Invented in 1817, it had no chain and was powered by the rider pushing his feet along the ground in a walking or running motion.

Even more unusually, its frame was made from wood.

Jump forward to 2017, and a crop of bike makers is turning back the clock – at least in terms of using wood as a core material.

These firms make their bicycles in part, and occasionally wholly, from woods such as ash, oak and walnut.

They are driven by a love of craft and design, the desire to use natural materials, and a passion for cycling itself.

And they have attracted a small but growing base of enthusiastic customers, willing to pay high prices for their lovingly crafted creations.

“People like having something unique, something different,” says Chris Connor, the founder of Connor Wood Bicycles.

“They also appreciate the craftsmanship. Not a lot of things are built by hand these days.”

The company was born in 2012, after the 48-year-old American decided to combine his long held passions for woodwork and cycling.

All his bikes all have wooden frames; the other parts, such as the gears and wheels, are made from steel, carbon or rubber.

Prices range from $3,500 (£2,600) to $11,000.

Sales have gradually been increasing, but it hasn’t been easy, says Mr Connor. That’s because of a perception among some cyclists that wooden bikes may break or be unsafe.

In fact, Mr Connor says wood is very durable, which is why it’s used to make tool handles, skis, boats, even light aircraft.

It also absorbs vibrations well, making cycling on bumpy roads smoother, less tiring and quieter.

“And of course, these bikes look great,” says Mr Connor, who makes his frames made from “strong but flexible” white ash or “eye candy” black walnut.

A recently published book called “The Wooden Bicycle: Around the World” features 111 companies that make bikes from wood or bamboo.

Only one, Splinterbike in the UK, sells 100% wooden models with its bikes featuring wooden gears, chains and wheels.

However, most limit their use of wood to the frame, and occasionally parts such as the handlebars and forks. Other parts will be made from materials typically associated with bikes, such as aluminium.

It is the unique design of wooden bikes, and their bespoke craftsmanship, that underpins their appeal, says Gregor Cuzak.

The Slovenian co-founded Woodster Bikes after meeting woodworker Iztok Mohoric, who had recently designed a bike with a wooden frame.

“I wasn’t interested at first, but after I saw it and took a ride, I was immediately convinced,” Mr Cuzak says. “People were watching me as if I was driving a wild sports car.”

Like other firms in the space, Woodster is targeting customers who appreciate the finer things in life. Its bike frames are made of woods such as beech and bog oak, and prices range from 2,500 euros (£2,190) up to 17,000 euros.

In addition, every customer gets a book with a story about how their individual bike was made.

“We even plant a new tree at the same location where we cut one for your bike,” Mr Cuzak adds.

Piet Brandjes, 63, who co-founded Dutch firm Bough Bikes, agrees that wooden bikes “attract attention”.

For that reason, firms in the Netherlands such as Novotel and Rabobank have bought Bough Bikes for their guests and employees to use.

By Thessa Lageman

Chris Gardner’s Top 10 Rules for Success

 

In the 1980’s he was homeless while he tried to raise his toddler son.
To get off the streets he became a stockbroker and later, an entrepreneur.
Today he’s worth millions and had Will Smith play him in a movie.
He’s Chris Gardner and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.

This barista quit the military to become a coffee artist

 

This barista quit the military to become a coffee artist – and he’s now an Instagram sensation

Lee Kang Bin is a “coffee artist” who on coffee foam.

The South Korean barista recreated famous paintings – like Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” and Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” – as well as Disney and other characters.

Before opening his own coffee shop in Seoul, he served in the military and even opened a cafe in his military camp.

For his cups, he uses cold coffee, cream, chocolate sauce, espresso, and food colouring. One costs around £6.50.

Relativity the company going to space on the cheap

 

Relativity Space and its two founders – Tim and Jordan – have a plan to make rockets faster and cheaper than anyone else. To do this, they’re looking to build every part of a rocket – its engine, its fuel tanks and its body – with giant 3D printers.

Amazon and eBay warned over VAT fraudsters by MP

 

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Wed, 18 Oct 2017) London, Uk – –

Amazon and eBay are profiting from sellers who defraud UK taxpayers by failing to charge VAT, according to a report by MPs.

The report estimates up to £1.5bn has been lost from third-party sellers on online marketplaces not charging the tax on sales they make in the UK.

MPs in the Public Accounts Committee criticised HMRC for being “too cautious” in pursuing the “fraudsters”.

Amazon and eBay said they were working with HMRC on the issue.

Labour MP Meg Hillier, who chairs the committee, called online VAT fraud “hugely damaging” for British businesses and taxpayers.

She added that “the response of HMRC and the marketplaces where fraudsters operate has been dismal”.

‘Bewildering’

The fraud has increased because foreign firms selling goods to UK shoppers – usually via online marketplaces like Amazon and eBay – are keeping some of their stock in UK warehouses to provide next day delivery.

If items are dispatched from UK soil, the sellers have to charge VAT at 20%.

But many have not been, so undercutting genuine UK suppliers and reducing tax revenue, the committee’s report found.

Brexit will make the issue more complicated because of uncertainty over trading and customs, it added.

Both Amazon and eBay told the committee they took action to remove “bad actors” from their sites.

But the report said it was “bewildering that these big companies have taken such little action to date”.

It added that Amazon and eBay, amongst other online marketplaces, “continue to profit from fraudulent activities taking place on their sites” by charging the sellers a commission.

In the hearings a pack of lightbulb socket converters and a hose for a Dyson vacuum cleaner were held up as examples of products sold without VAT.

‘Above and beyond’

The report’s conclusions include:

  • The UK’s tax agency, HMRC, should set up an agreement with online marketplaces by March next year to tackle the issue
  • The websites should require non-EU sellers – which dispatch goods already in the UK – to provide a valid VAT number
  • HMRC should “inject more urgency” by making more extensive use of its existing powers

HMRC said it had introduced new rules last year to hold online marketplaces liable for unpaid VAT by overseas sellers, leading to a ten-fold rise in the number of sellers registering for VAT.

“The new reforms will secure an extra £875m in tax to help pay for vital public services,” an HMRC spokesman said.

In a statement Amazon said it was reviewing the report and supported efforts to ensure sellers across all marketplaces were VAT compliant.

An eBay spokesperson said it was going “above and beyond” HMRC’s requirements to provide a “fair marketplace for all our buyers and sellers”.

Meet the company where luxury and philanthropy go hand in hand

(qlmbusinessnews.com via livingit.euronews.com – – Sat, 14 Oct 2017) London, Uk – –

Want to spice up your next trip by making a contribution to the local population? You will return home with the best souvenir: the satisfaction of knowing you made a difference. An ever-growing group of socially engaged travelers has already changed thousands of people’s lives.

There is no better place to watch whales than the island where locals have strong cultural affinities with these beautiful marine creatures. In New Zeland, the indigenous Māori people have a long history with whales: local legend says that their ancestors arrived on the island on the back of a whale. The locals believe in a spiritual bond with the animals.

Today, this tribe happens to possess one of the most successful companies organizing whale watch tours, among other activities, in the local town of Kaikoura. In fact, the local community trust, founded in 1987 by four Maori families, has played a huge role in reviving the town’s declining economy. They have transformed Kaikoura into a leading eco-tourism destination and the Whale Watch Kaikoura became the largest employer of the season. The enterprise invests a huge part of their annual profit in supporting the community, education, employment, and protecting the environment.

The company offers up-close encounters with giant sperm whales and strives to minimise their impact on the environment. It also runs educational programmes on how to save the environment as well as eco-friendly activities for visitors, such as planting your own tree.

By Doloresz Katanich

 

Banks losing out on £130bn business opportunity by failing to connect with women


(qlmbusinessnews.com via independent.co.uk – – Wed, 11 Oct 2017) London, Uk – –

Banks are failing to connect with women who view financial advisers as arrogant, self-interested and untrustworthy, according to new research.

The report from insight and consultancy business Kantar, showed that financial institutions are losing out on a £130bn business opportunity by not appealing to women.

“In failing to develop client experiences rooted in men and women’s fundamentally different perspectives on finance, financial services institutions are missing a very significant business opportunity,” said Bart Michels, UK country leader for Kantar.

“Financial institutions are focusing their efforts on the confident, rather than the competent.”

The research, based on interviews, social media analysis and data from target group index (TGI), which is part of Kantar Media, showed that banks’ advertising fails to consistently communicate qualities including ‘trustworthiness’, ‘understanding’, ‘dependability’ and ‘accessibility’ to women when tested using facial recognition technology.

According to the report, women tend to focus more on relationships and family life when dealing with finances than men, who are interested in products and price. Women also have less time than men to plan for their future.

But women are an attractive prospect for banks. By 2020, they will hold over half of investable assets.

The report shows that satisfied female clients are twice as likely to recommend their bank, they typically hold more savings, mortgage and general insuranceproducts than men and are more loyal.

Women were also shown to be more responsible borrowers with a more conservative approach to the financial barriers to homeownership – two thirds of men under-estimated the cost of buying their home compared to half of women.

However, Kantar’s research shows that women are less financially confident. Among female customers, 65 per cent were found to have low financial confidence compared to 55 per cent of men.

Amy Cashman, UK managing director of financial services and technology at Kantar TNS and the study’s lead author, said: “Women’s lower engagement is also a major factor behind their concerns and shortfalls in retirement income.”

Men’s average retirement savings of £73,600 were three times more than women’s at £24,900, she said.

“This makes improved engagement of women in the financial sector a social imperative as well as commercial opportunity.”

To find out the differences between men’s and women’s relationship to finance, the report’s authors interviewed over 2,000 men and women, analysed over 1.5 million social media posts, used facial recognition technology to analyse reactions to adverts and analysed TGI data, which offers a complete view of consumer behaviour and motivations.

Most research was conducted between May and September 2017 while the social media data was gathered over the past year.

By Emma Featherstone

Airbnb paid less than £200,000 in UK corporation tax last year

 

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Mon, 9 Oct 2017) London, Uk – –

Airbnb, the accommodation website, paid less than £200,000 in UK corporation tax last year despite collecting £657m of rental payments for property owners.

The commissions the company earns in the UK are booked by its Irish subsidiary, but it also has two UK subsidiaries.

One unit made a pre-tax profit, but the other did not incur UK corporation tax because deductions resulted in a loss.

Airbnb said in a statement: “We follow the rules and pay all the tax we owe.”

One of the British subsidiaries, Airbnb Payments UK, handles payments between landlords and travellers for countries other than the United States, China and India.

That unit made a pre-tax profit of £960,000 and paid £188,000 in UK corporation tax – £8,000 less than in 2015.

The other British subsidiary, Airbnb UK, markets the website and app to British consumers. It reported a £463,000 pre-tax profit last year but because it gave shares to staff, which are tax-deductable, there was no corporation tax bill.

Airbnb said: “Our UK office provides marketing services and pays all applicable taxes, including VAT. The Airbnb model is unique and boosted the UK economy by £3.46bn last year alone.”

The tax arrangements of other technology giants have come under under closer scrutiny in recent years.

One of the most vocal critics has been EU competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager. She has taken aim at the likes of Apple, Amazon and others for where they book the revenues and profits of their European activities.

Bruno Le Maire, the French finance minister, has also asked why Airbnb paid tens of thousand of euros in French corporation tax despite a turnover in the millions.

The company, founded in San Francisco in 2008, has disrupted the hotel industry by linking travellers with landlords who generally want to rent out a spare room or an entire property for short-term stays.

It has become one of the most successful examples of the digital economy, with an estimated value of about $24bn.

However, Airbnb has faced a growing backlash in cities including Barcelona, Berlin and Paris, where politicians have taken steps to stop landlords renting properties to tourists rather than local residents.

While Airbnb has long been linked with a stock market listing, it remains privately owned.

It takes a 3% commission from landlords for each booking, and also charges fees to travellers.

In the UK last year Airbnb catered for 5.9m travellers and had 168,000 listings.

 

Bruce Lee’s Top 10 Rules For Success

 

He was a martial artist, actor, teacher, and philosopher. He is widely considered to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time. He is often credited with helping change the way Asians were presented in American films. He’s Bruce Lee and here are his Top 10 Rules for success.

Physicist Robert Lang incredible origami journey

 

Twenty five years ago, physicist Robert Lang worked at NASA, where he researched lasers. He has also garnered 46 patents on optoelectronics and even wrote a Ph.D. thesis called “Semiconductor Lasers: New Geometries and Spectral Properties.” But in 2001, Lang left his job in order to pursue a passion he’s had since childhood: origami. In the origami world, Lang is now a legend, and it’s not just his eye-catching, intricate designs that have taken the craft by storm. Some of his work has helped pioneer new ways of applying origami principles to complex real-world engineering problems.

25 Things You Didn’t Know About Money

 

We love money! We work hard to get it, spend it fast, always on the chase for more. As the famous lyrics say: money makes the world go round! But for something we use so frequently we know very little about. Let’s see how many of these you already knew!

1. 90% of the US dollar bills contain traces of cocaine!

2. The first Credit Card was created because of the embarrassment of a man who had to pay for dinner but forgot his wallet.

3. US Debt is 10 times larger than the US dollars in circulation.

4. All US$ coins and bills in circulation today are worth US$1.2 trillion.

5. Two thirds of that money is held overseas.

6. Paper money originated in China 1400 years ago.

7. Changing the $1 bill into a $1 coin would save the US 4.4 Billion in the next 30 years.