Bruce Lee’s Top 10 Rules For Success

 

He was a martial artist, actor, teacher, and philosopher. He is widely considered to be one of the most influential martial artists of all time. He is often credited with helping change the way Asians were presented in American films. He’s Bruce Lee and here are his Top 10 Rules for success.

Boxing titan Mayweather’s networth explained

(qlmbusinessnews.com via independent.co.uk – – Sat, 30 Sept 2017) London, Uk – –

Mayweather has generated around 19.5m in PPV buys and $1.3bn in revenue throughout his career, with the McGregor fight likely to boost his career earnings over the $1bn mark

Floyd Mayweather is one of the biggest pay-per-view attractions of all time and one of a very elite group of athletes to see their career earnings nose above the $1bn mark.

A shrewd businessman and the greatest boxer of his generation — if not all time — Mayweather has been listed as the highest paid athlete in the world four times by the American business magazine Forbes.

Mayweather is so rich that he even changed his boxing identity to reflect his staggering wealth.

The American was known as “Pretty Boy” throughout his entire career, as a result of how little he got hit due to his superior defensive skills. But in 2007 before the biggest fight of his life against Oscar De La Hoya, Mayweather unleashed a new name: “Money.”

He is also known as the ‘PPV King’ due to his phenomenal success at the box office. His fight against Canelo Alvarez attracted over 2m buys and $150m (£116m) in revenue — but these numbers were dwarfed by his fight against Manny Pacquiao, with 4.6m buys and $400m (£308m) in revenue.

In total, he has attracted 19.5 buys and around $1.3bn in revenue.

But what is his estimated net worth? Who are his sponsors? And exactly how much money does he stand to make by fighting McGregor?

Here everything you need to know about Mayweather’s extraordinary financial muscle.

What is Mayweather’s estimated net worth?

Floyd Mayweather is one of the very richest athletes in the world, topping the Forbes and Sports Illustrated lists of the 50 highest-paid athletes of 2012 and 2013 respectively, and the Forbes list again in both 2014 and 2015.

Mayweather has generated just under 20m PPV buys and over $1bn in revenue throughout his career, surpassing the likes of former top boxers such as Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Lennox Lewis, Oscar De La Hoya, and Manny Pacquiao. His PPV buys and revenue dwarf that of McGregor.

In 2016, the American business magazine Forbes reported that Mayweather banked $32 million (£25m) from his ‘retirement’ fight against Andre Berto fight to bring his career earnings to around $700 million (£540m).

Given that Mayweather made roughly $250 million (£193m) for the Pacquiao fight, it can be safely assumed that his career earnings will surpass $1bn this summer.

According to Forbes: “Another massive purse awits the five-division world champion in August for his boxing match versus UFC star Conor McGregor. If Mayweather can secure a similar payday to his 2015 Manny Pacquiao bout, it will push his career earnings to $1 billion.”

How many other athletes have made over $1bn during their careers?

Not many. The only other athletes to earn such a large amount of money during their sporting careers are basketball player Michael Jordan ($1.5bn) and Tiger Woods ($1.4bn), who both enjoyed a number of lucrative sponsorships, principally with Nike.

There are three others if you adjust for inflation: golfers Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus, and seven-time Formula 1 world champion Michael Schumacher.

Who sponsors Mayweather?

Perhaps surprisingly, Mayweather doesn’t have that many active sponsorships. In 2015, he told Fortune magazine that this was not because brands were not interested in working with him, but because his baseline for entry is too high for most. How much does he demand? $1m.

This may only partially be the reason. Mayweather also has a chequered past, and has previously been charged with domestic violence and misdemeanor battery, which means that some brands may have been reluctant to work with him.

For the Pacquiao fight, three brands did decide to sponsor him however. Burger King, daily fantasy sports site FanDuel, and Swiss watchmaker Hublot all dished out over $1m.

Why did he split with Top Rank?

In 2007 Mayweather founded his own boxing promotional firm, Mayweather Promotions, after defecting from Bob Arum’s Top Rank.

He broke ties with Top Rank after activating a $750k (£578k) break clause, believing that he could make more money promoting his own fights.

It proved to be a shrewd choice: he earned pay checks ranging between $25m-$40m (£19.3m-£31m) over the next six years, before he broke new records for his fight against Canelo Alvarez, which netted him over $70m (£54m).

What has his richest fight been?

Until now, it has been the contest with Pacquiao. Mayweather is believed to have made $220m (£175m) from the contest, with the fight generating an incredible $600m (£470m) in revenues.

For his last fight, a unanimous points decision win against Andre Berto, he secured far less: $32m (£25m).

And how much does Mayweather stand to earn from this fight?

If the PPV stays roughly in line with the Mayweather v Pacquiao fight, the Mayweather v McGregor fight purse is likely to be worth around $390m (£300m). Total revenues are meanwhile expected to exceed $500m (£390m).

Somewhat unfortunately, the two men signed a confidentiality agreement when they signed their contracts, meaning the exact split will not be revealed.

We know that Mayweather is getting more however, with estimates ranging in the 70-75% region

By Luke Brown

The CEO offering a monthly clothing subscription box for men

 

Andres Izquieta is the CEO of Five-Four Club, a monthly clothing subscription box for men. Andres says entrepreneurs have ideas and find out how to go out and execute that idea. Andres talks about how he always knew he wanted to become an entrepreneur and start his own business. He talks about their first round of funding, and how they use Instagram as a tool for their business.

Wall Street’s oldest steakhouse ultra-decadent secret ‘billionaire menu’

 

Just a few short blocks from the New York Stock Exchange, another Wall Street institution sits at its centuries-long perch at the triangular intersection of William and Beaver streets.

Delmonico’s is widely considered to be one of the very first sit down restaurants in America, born at a time when New York offered little more than taverns and oyster cellars. Culinary mainstays like eggs benedict and baked Alaska were invented in their kitchen.

While Delmonico’s is (rightly) renowned for its steak offerings, Executive Chef Billy Oliva tipped us off to several decadent items that aren’t on the printed menu. Skip the dining room and head straight to the bar to ask the bartender for these secret items like a $100 grilled cheese or a $50 cookie.

Delmonico’s is celebrating its 180th anniversary in September in style, offering a 180-day dry aged steak for a whopping $380.

Farmstand Pop-up Health Food Business Taking London By Storm

“If you’re launching an online-only food business, you’re competing with hundreds of thousands of stores; if you want to create a high street chain, you’re up against Pret and McDonald’s,” says Steven Novick, founder of health food business Farmstand. Faced with this conundrum, Novick has eschewed more traditional business models.

After launching a restaurant in Covent Garden, London, Novick took a nimble approach to growth. Over the past 18 months, he’s opened 17 pop-ups across the capital in office canteens, a stand in Planet Organic and corporate catering and delivery services.

Due to London’s high commercial rents, and the doubling of business rates in some areas, it’s not economical for a small firm to rent lots of property, so Farmstand has streamlined operations. All of its food is prepared in a 2,000 sq ft kitchen in south London, from where it is delivered to pop-ups and business customers (around 30 subscribe to a daily delivery) across the city. Its deliveries are outsourced to an experienced courier.

Headcount is also kept to the minimum: 16 full-time staff, with 11 working in the central kitchen and five serving in the Covent Garden restaurant. Farmstand’s in-office pop-ups are staffed by the customer. With this approach, Farmstand’s revenue has grown by an average of 26% month-on-month since opening in February 2016.

Another business with a canny growth strategy is Chester-based, AM Custom Clothing, which provides personalised, printed garments (from T-shirts to lanyards) to universities and businesses. Co-founder Alex Franklin says: “A lot of fashion companies will have have warehouses filled with stock, but we have a unique relationship with our suppliers.” Franklin doesn’t store stock. Instead he calls on his network of 15-20 suppliers of plain clothing when an order comes in. Altogether, Franklin’s suppliers have around 12m items in stock.

However, getting to this point has not come without difficulty. In the past, the business has experienced much greater demand than anticipated, which put pressure on its supply chain. “Since then we have adapted our business model, to make it as scalable as possible, most of this was achieved through automation,” Franklin says. While stock shortages can still occur, the amount of stock at hand now allows the business to find alternatives when needed.

Automating orders and deliveries, and using a computer bot to follow-up on customer enquires, has also smoothed operations. But, Franklin adds, all clients have a dedicated account manager to ensure strong customer service.

While some businesses can handle most operations online, others do require a physical space. So how can entrepreneurs in this situation cut costs? Market stalls and pop-ups, which have been made more accessible thanks to apps such as Appear Here, are one way to trial locations without committing to long-term leases. Meanwhile, some small food businesses might opt for a service such as Deliveroo’s purpose-built kitchens, called Deliveroo Editions. Initially designed as overflow kitchens for established companies, now smaller firms are using these spaces to reach customers outside of their delivery area.

“They are very cheap to set up, so we decided to use them to bring new types of cuisines to areas where we found a gap,” says Rohan Pradhan, vice president of Deliveroo. Deliveroo sometimes takes a higher commission from the sale of small firms using its kitchens. This, Pradhan says, is in order to buffer the risk of the businesses not working out.

Pradhan cites Crust Bros pizza company as a successful example of this relationship. Crust Bros’ founder, Joseph Moore, started his business in 2014 as a stall on Southbank market, originally named Dough Bros. Using Deliveroo’s kitchen service, he has doubled sales. Moore says: “It’s been a good testbed for opening our first restaurant this summer, there were some teething issues at the start [such as pizzas not arriving with customers piping hot]. But now we’ve got the process down.”

Rapid expansion can also occur when entrepreneurs add a subscription element to their businesses – and it can be overwhelming. Vanessa McDermott, founder of creative startup Vee McDee, which delivers craft sets to customers, discovered this while crowdfunding on Kickstarter.

McDermott was raising money to launch a creative studio in Bolton. Through Kickstarter’s crowdfunding model, backers of her idea were offered craft sets as a reward. The sets proved a hit, word spread and people were soon asking where they could buy the packs. Then orders mushroomed. “I [quickly] went from selling 30 packs a month to 700,” says McDermott. “It was hard because keeping the quality up is so important to me, I didn’t want to lose that [as custom grew].”

To avoid this, McDermott outsourced the delivery of the kits to a subscription service that works with startups. “My advice would be to anyone in this position to partner with people who have the infrastructure in place to help with the technical and logistical side [of a subscription service],” she says.

Expanding a business while keeping outgoings lean can be a challenge, but these approaches offer food for thought. Some might still argue that a physical space is key to building a business. However, a more flexible approach has its benefits, says Ian Roberts, an SME adviser with Business Doctors consultancy. “To me, high levels of service and product quality are still a better way to build a strong and positive brand identity, than physical presence.”

Peter Kelly, a senior finance partner with PwC’s small business service MyFinance, agrees. He says that one of the hardest things when expanding is finding the right people to work with and identifying gaps in your expertise. He adds: “It’s hard because [your business] is your baby, but to expand efficiently while keeping up quality you should outsource if you can […] Use spare to money to invest in the areas that will help make [your business] profitable.”

By Helen Lock

Harmonie Krieger, Founder of Pop Your Shop, Success Story

 

Harmonie Krieger, Founder of Pop Your Shop, says you have to be nuts. You have to love what you do. You have to change your mindset in order to be a good entrepreneur.

Starting a business is TOUGH. Wanting to give up everyday is not a crazy thing, you have to power through it. Harmonie’s advice: change the way you think. She was so overwhelmed, didn’t know where to begin, couldn’t relax. So she started with deep breaths, self-help books, and changing her mindset.

Harmonie believes determination, being hungry, and having the drive are fundamental for success. “Just go for it, just keep going because if you stop, the hustle stops. The passion dies. You don’t have it anymore… It doesn’t matter what the hustle is, it just matters that you move forward.”

She talks about the importance of allocating the things you aren’t good at to other people, so that you don’t spend more time on the things you can’t really do well.

Last words of advice: Find a mentor. Ask for help.

Elise Mitchell: Courage Is The Key To Entrepreneurship

 

Elise Mitchell, CEO of Mitchell Communications Group talks about self-funding her business! She also talks about taking that courageous first step to starting her own business and how her employer at the time, ended up being her first client! Elise says, “the funny thing about entrepreneurship is you never know when that first opportunity is going to arise. You have to be willing to take a chance when it comes.”

The remarkable Tyler Perry’s Top 10 Rules For Success

 

He’s an American actor, filmmaker, television producer and songwriter, specializing in the gospel genre.

He wrote and produced many stage plays during the 1990s and early 2000s.

In 2011, Forbes named him the highest paid man in entertainment; he earned US$130 million between May 2010 and 2011.

He’s Tyler Perry and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.

Watch this inspiring motivational interview with Founder of SunLife Organics

 

Khalil Rafati, Owner/Founder of SunLife Organics, sits down with Mark Lack to talk about killing it in the juice space racking in 10s of millions in sales. Khalil has an amazing story – it started from a rough childhood into drug addiction, to homelessness, to mental illness, he was a convicted felon high school dropout and ended up sobering up 13 years ago at the age of 33 to start a couple of business and gain a ton of success.

Take an exclusive look at Life onboard a private jet

 

Take an exclusive look at Life onboard a private jet

Flying aboard your own jet means one thing – luxury. From fine china to restaurant quality food, anything is possible. So just what can you expect if you fly on a PJ soon? CNBC’s Phil Han steps onboard a Global 6000 to find out.