How getting fired, turned Melissa Ben-Ishay passion for baking cupcakes into a successful business

 

Entrepreneur

When Melissa Ben-Ishay got fired, she immediately called her brother. He encouraged her to go home, bake her famous cupcakes and reassured her they would figure out how to turn her hobby into a business. Within a week, Baked by Melissa was up and running. Fourteen stores and a cookbook later, Melissa’s bite-size treats are a huge success. She sat down with Jessica Abo to talk about her company’s growth, the friends who helped her get here and what she’s created to help you celebrate Valentine’s Day.

 

 

 

Will Smith shares his success philosophy

 

He’s the only actor to have eight consecutive films gross over $100 million in the domestic box office. He has been ranked as the most bankable star worldwide by Forbes. As of 2016, his films have grossed $7.5 billion at the global box office. For his performances in Ali, and in The Pursuit of Happyness, Smith received nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actor. He has won four Grammy Awards. He turned down the role of Neo in The Matrix in favor of Wild Wild West. In 2005, Smith was entered into the Guinness Book of World Records for attending three premieres in a 24-hour time span.

 

 

 

Ikea Swedish furniture founder Ingvar Kamprad has died at the age of 91

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Mon, 29 Jan 2018) London, Uk – –

The Swedish founder of the Ikea furniture chain, Ingvar Kamprad, has died at the age of 91, the company has announced.

Mr Kamprad – who pioneered flat-pack furniture – died at his home in Småland, Ikea confirmed in a statement.

The company said that Mr Kamprad was “one of the greatest entrepreneurs of the 20th century”.

The billionaire, who was born in 1926 in Småland, founded Ikea at the age of 17.

He used some money his father had given him as a gift for performing well at school despite his dyslexia.

In the later years of his life, Mr Kamprad faced questions over his past links to fascist groups – something he admitted, but said was a “mistake”.

In a statement on Sunday, Ikea said that Mr Kamprad had “peacefully passed away at his home”.

“He worked until the very end of his life, staying true to his own motto that most things remain to be done,” it added. Mr Kamprad eventually stepped down from the company’s board in 2013, at the age of 87.

“Ingvar Kamprad was a great entrepreneur of the typical southern Swedish kind – hardworking and stubborn, with a lot of warmth and a playful twinkle in his eye,” the company said.

His company’s designs became popular in part because of their simplicity and value.

Mr Kamprad is reported to have come up with the idea of flat-pack furniture after watching an employee remove the legs from a table in order to fit it into a customer’s car.

Furniture designer Jeff Banks said that Mr Kamprad’s creations radically changed how people made and designed products for the home.

“People have tried to reproduce and copy that, but unsuccessfully,” he said.

Mr Banks added that the designs produced and sold through the retailer made good use of recyclable products, adding that Mr Kamprad was “head and shoulders above the rest”.

Mr Kamprad was renowned for his devotion to frugality, reportedly driving an old Volvo and travelling by economy class.

In a 2016 interview with Swedish television channel TV4, Mr Kamprad said that it was “in the nature of Småland to be thrifty”.

“If you look at me now, I don’t think I’m wearing anything that wasn’t bought at a flea market,” he said.

He told the channel that he built his business on a “local ethos”.

“We have Småland in the blood, and we know what a krona is – even though it is not as much as it was when we bought candy and went to elementary school,” he said, referring to the Swedish currency.

People took to social media on Sunday to pay their respects to the “greatest Swedish entrepreneur to have ever lived”.

Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom tweeted her condolences, saying that Mr Kamprad had “put Sweden on the world map”.

Ikea: Key facts

  • Ikea started in 1943 and now has 389 stores worldwide
  • The name comes from Mr Kamprad’s initials (IK), together with the name of the farm he grew up on – Elmtaryd (E) – and the nearby village Agunnaryd (A)
  • The company’s retail sales totalled 36.4bn euros ($43bn, £30bn) in 2016
  • Its flat-pack furniture became iconic both for its affordability and for its picture-based assembly instructions

Ikea has remained privately-owned under a Dutch trust operated by the Kamprad family. Its complex business structure has drawn controversy and the European Commission said last year that it had launched an investigation into Ikea’s tax arrangements.

The European Green Party said that the arrangement had allowed the company to avoid paying some €1bn in tax between 2009 and 2014.

A spokesman for Dutch-based Inter Ikea, one of the company’s two divisions, said that the company had been taxed “in accordance with EU rules”.

In an interview in the 1980s, Mr Kamprad said that his vision for Ikea was that it would be a company that would make life easier for its customers.

In more recent years, Mr Kamprad had faced scrutiny over his past links to Nazi groups.

The tycoon revealed some elements of his past in a book in 1988, admitting that he was a close friend of the Swedish fascist activist Per Engdahl, and a member of his New Swedish Movement between 1942 and 1945.

He said that his involvement was youthful “stupidity” and the “greatest mistake” of his life.

But a 2011 book by Elisabeth Asbrink alleged details beyond what Mr Kamprad had previously admitted. She wrote that he was an active recruiter for a Swedish Nazi group, and stayed close to sympathisers well after World War Two.

At the time a spokesman for Mr Kamprad said he had long admitted flirting with fascism, but that there were now “no Nazi-sympathising thoughts in Ingvar’s head whatsoever”.

 

 

 

 

Mitch Langstein director for Cellular Accessories: Make Your Business Dream Your Reality

 

Mitch Langstein is the marketing director for Cellular Accessories. Mitch explains what entrepreneurship means to him and how he knew he wanted to be an entrepreneur out of college. Mitch talks about where he got the idea for his business and how he turned that idea into a reality!

 

Marcus Lemonis’s Top 10 Rules For Success

 

He’s an businessman, inventor, television personality and philanthropist. He is currently the chairman and CEO of Camping World and Good Sam Enterprises, and the star of The Profit, a CNBC reality show about saving small businesses. He leads close to 6,000 employees in over 100 cities across the US. He’s Marcus Lemonis and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK’s Youngest Millionaire Who Started His Online Business Whilst Studying For His A-levels

Akshay Ruparelia was just 17 years-old when he started his online business, all whilst studying for his A-levels and acting as a carer for his parents, who are both deaf. Akshay joins Holly and Phillip to talk about his business which is currently estimated to be worth over £12 million!

 

Tony Robbins Top Ten Rules For Success

Evan Carmichael top ten rules for success/youtube

If you’re looking for ways to Find fulfillment, change your story, and own your business, this video is for you. Grab a snack and chew on today’s lessons from a man who went from having 7 fathers growing up and leaving home at 17 due to an abusive home to founding companies that earn $6 billion in annual sales and advises Presidents. He’s Tony Robbins and here’s  his Top 10 Rules for Success, volume 3.

 

George Lucas Top 10 Rules for Success

 

George Lucas
Evan Carmichael/Youtube
He’s an American filmmaker and entrepreneur. He’s best known as the creator of the Star Wars and Indiana Jones franchises, as well as the founder of Lucasfilm. As of March 2015, Lucas’ net worth was estimated by Forbes at US$5.1 billion. He’s George Lucas and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.

 

 

Richard Reed Innocent Drinks Founder advice to Small business

(qlmbusinessnews.com via travelers.co.uk – – Sun, 10 Dec 2017) London, Uk – –

Innocent Drinks is known for its upbeat, playful brand. Founder Richard Reed offers his thoughts on why giving your brand a clear mission helps guide your business.

Focus on what you can control in business

“There are plenty of businesses that do well in the bad times, and there are plenty of businesses that do badly in the good times. The trick to staying positive is not to get too distracted by the external events you can’t control, and double down and focus on the things that you can.

“Ask yourself: have you got the right strategy? Are you effectively using that strategy? Are you attracting and retaining talent? Are you looking after your consumer better than the competition? And are you doing so in a meaningful way?”

Be prepared to adapt when you face challenges as a startup

“In 2008 when the credit crunch struck, we lost a third of our sales over a three-month period. We owed money to the banks, fruit prices went up due to a failure in world harvest, and the pound collapsed by 25%.

“Suddenly, consumers were saying our products were too expensive, but we were losing money on every single smoothie sold.

“We could have made our smoothies cheaper by reducing quality, but Innocent is about making the most natural, best quality drinks. Instead of changing our recipes, we resized our product to adapt to market pressures.”

Cut prices without compromise

“There are times when you’re going to need to make yourself cheaper because consumers have less money, but there will be a way of doing it which is in line with your brand.

“We knew there was absolutely no way we could compromise on quality, instead we sold smoothies in cartons of 750ml rather than 1litre. We made them smaller but we made the price smaller too – that actually turned the business around.”

Stay balanced through the highs and lows

“The bad times don’t last forever. They come in waves. Make sure you keep focused on the things that are important like looking after your consumer, making sure that the business is economically sound, and doing what you can to look after and attract talent.

“When you’re going through the good times, remember they’re going to end. Use the good times to build up a cushion of natural resource. It’s a classic thing, when the sun is shining, that’s when you start mending the roof – don’t wait until it’s raining.”

 

 

Tilman Fertitta the billionaire on how to be successful

 

Business Rockstars/Youtube

Tilman Fertitta, CEO of Landry’s Inc. – one of the nation’s largest restaurant corporations, sits down with Mark Lack. Tilman talks about owning Golden Nugget Casinos and Landry’s (worth over $3 billion) – the Houston-based restaurant and entertainment company that owns more than 500 properties and 40 brands of restaurants, including Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. and Morton’s The Steakhouse. Fertitta is the chairman and CEO. His CNBC show called “Billion Dollar Buyer” premiered in March 2016 and was renewed for a second season. He talks about going public, and then taking it back to private. He talks about growing his company to a billion dollar company. He gives great business advice and more!! He has 3 tips for anyone starting a business. Tilman is the man.

The bespoke craftsmanship and unique design of Connor Wood bicycles

 

Source/Youtube

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 25 Nov 2017) London, Uk – –

The forerunner of the bicycle – the laufmaschine or running machine – bears only a passing resemblance to the pedal-bikes we know today.

Invented in 1817, it had no chain and was powered by the rider pushing his feet along the ground in a walking or running motion.

Even more unusually, its frame was made from wood.

Jump forward to 2017, and a crop of bike makers is turning back the clock – at least in terms of using wood as a core material.

These firms make their bicycles in part, and occasionally wholly, from woods such as ash, oak and walnut.

They are driven by a love of craft and design, the desire to use natural materials, and a passion for cycling itself.

And they have attracted a small but growing base of enthusiastic customers, willing to pay high prices for their lovingly crafted creations.

“People like having something unique, something different,” says Chris Connor, the founder of Connor Wood Bicycles.

“They also appreciate the craftsmanship. Not a lot of things are built by hand these days.”

The company was born in 2012, after the 48-year-old American decided to combine his long held passions for woodwork and cycling.

All his bikes all have wooden frames; the other parts, such as the gears and wheels, are made from steel, carbon or rubber.

Prices range from $3,500 (£2,600) to $11,000.

Sales have gradually been increasing, but it hasn’t been easy, says Mr Connor. That’s because of a perception among some cyclists that wooden bikes may break or be unsafe.

In fact, Mr Connor says wood is very durable, which is why it’s used to make tool handles, skis, boats, even light aircraft.

It also absorbs vibrations well, making cycling on bumpy roads smoother, less tiring and quieter.

“And of course, these bikes look great,” says Mr Connor, who makes his frames made from “strong but flexible” white ash or “eye candy” black walnut.

A recently published book called “The Wooden Bicycle: Around the World” features 111 companies that make bikes from wood or bamboo.

Only one, Splinterbike in the UK, sells 100% wooden models with its bikes featuring wooden gears, chains and wheels.

However, most limit their use of wood to the frame, and occasionally parts such as the handlebars and forks. Other parts will be made from materials typically associated with bikes, such as aluminium.

It is the unique design of wooden bikes, and their bespoke craftsmanship, that underpins their appeal, says Gregor Cuzak.

The Slovenian co-founded Woodster Bikes after meeting woodworker Iztok Mohoric, who had recently designed a bike with a wooden frame.

“I wasn’t interested at first, but after I saw it and took a ride, I was immediately convinced,” Mr Cuzak says. “People were watching me as if I was driving a wild sports car.”

Like other firms in the space, Woodster is targeting customers who appreciate the finer things in life. Its bike frames are made of woods such as beech and bog oak, and prices range from 2,500 euros (£2,190) up to 17,000 euros.

In addition, every customer gets a book with a story about how their individual bike was made.

“We even plant a new tree at the same location where we cut one for your bike,” Mr Cuzak adds.

Piet Brandjes, 63, who co-founded Dutch firm Bough Bikes, agrees that wooden bikes “attract attention”.

For that reason, firms in the Netherlands such as Novotel and Rabobank have bought Bough Bikes for their guests and employees to use.

By Thessa Lageman

Chris Gardner’s Top 10 Rules for Success

 

In the 1980’s he was homeless while he tried to raise his toddler son.
To get off the streets he became a stockbroker and later, an entrepreneur.
Today he’s worth millions and had Will Smith play him in a movie.
He’s Chris Gardner and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.