Instagram co-founders step down from the photo sharing app

(qlmbusinessnews.com via telegraph.co.uk – – Tue, 25th Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

The co-founders of Instagram have stepped down from the photo sharing app, six years after it was acquired by Facebook for $1bn (£760m).

Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger informed Facebook's bosses of their resignation on Monday and plan to leave in the coming weeks, according to the New York Times.

The two have continued to run the app as chief executive and chief technology officer respectively as Instagram has ballooned from a hipster iPhone app to a giant with more than one billion users.

Their departure means that the founders of Facebook's three biggest acquisitions – WhatsApp, Oculus and now Instagram – have left since being bought by the social media giant. WhatsApp founder Jan Koum left Facebook earlier this year while Oculus Rift inventor Palmer Luckey departed last year amid a political row.

Reports of disagreements between Systrom and Krieger and Facebook's leadership have emerged in recent months. Mark Zuckerberg reportedly forced through the introduction of Instagram's Stories feature, a concept cloned from Snapchat, which has become wildly successful.

On Monday night Kevin Systrom posted a statement confirming the news:

“Mike and I are grateful for the last eight years at Instagram and six years with the Facebook team. We’ve grown from 13 people to over a thousand with offices around the world, all while building products used and loved by a community of over one billion. We’re now ready for our next chapter.

“We’re planning on taking some time off to explore our curiosity and creativity again. Building new things requires that we step back, understand what inspires us and match that with what the world needs; that’s what we plan to do.

“We remain excited for the future of Instagram and Facebook in the coming years as we transition from leaders to two users in a billion. We look forward to watching what these innovative and extraordinary companies do next.

Instagram has been one of Facebook's main bright spots as its owner has been beset by crises this year. The app had just 27m users when Facebook bought it in April 2012 but reached 1bn monthly users this summer. It has also offset a perceived exodus of younger users from the main Facebook social network.

News of their departure sparked speculation that Facebook had demanded a change to Instagram that Mr Systrom and Mr Krieger disagreed with.

Some reports have suggested the app is considering a “regram” button that would allow users to post other user's photos, similar to a Twitter retweet. The reports have been denied by Instagram.

A Facebook spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.

 

The Undercover Life Of A Female Bodyguard

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sun, 23rd Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

Jacquie Davis, who says she was the first woman to become a bodyguard in the UK, has protected royals and celebrities, rescued hostages and carried out undercover surveillance in her 30 years in the industry. Now her own life has inspired a Netflix thriller starring Noomi Rapace.

“When I came into the industry it was a very he-man attitude,” says Jacquie. “They just always wanted me to look after the female principal or the children which was ironic – as most of them were fathers and I wasn't even a mother!”

Having initially joined the police, Jacquie decided to move into private security in 1980 because it would give her more variety. “I wanted to do close protection, I wanted to do surveillance and wanted to do investigations,” she says.

Being a bodyguard is particularly high-profile at the moment thanks to Bodyguard, the BBC One drama starring Keeley Hawes as the UK's Home Secretary and Richard Madden as her personal protection officer. Writer Jed Mercurio's script is full of plot twists, guns – and a steamy relationship between the two lead characters.

“Technically it's been fine – it is a good drama,” says Jacquie, but while such relationships do occasionally happen “you'll get sacked immediately, no question”.

In her career she's travelled the world staying in five- and six-star hotels, but says “after 12 to 16 hours of thinking on your feet, it's not glamorous”. In addition to this, there is the toll on a bodyguard's private life. “You might not go home for eight to 10 weeks.”

Jacquie also specialises in the more dangerous end of the business – surveillance and rescue. Once she found herself begging on the streets of Iraq, disguised in a burka, as part of a mission to rescue oil workers.

While the job is about preventing danger to the client by planning ahead to avoid potential risks, sometimes real life can be as dramatic as any film or TV script.

 

 

“We were being chased by the Pakistan army and wandered into Kashmir,” she told BBC World Service's Business Daily programme. “The Kashmiri rebels were firing at the Pakistan army and we got caught in the crossfire.”

She and her team had gone undercover in a rescue mission to free a 23-year-old British woman who'd been tricked into going to Pakistan with her new husband.

Instead the woman was imprisoned, but eventually got a message to her mother telling her she was being held hostage and asking for help. Her mother contacted Jacquie.

One night, Jacquie broke into the villa where the woman was being held, handcuffed to an iron bedstead. “She said she was three months pregnant and was being raped, starved and beaten. I told her, ‘We will come back and get you out.'”

But suddenly they got a phone call telling them their cover was blown. “Benazir Bhutto, who I'd worked for [previously], had recognised me and thought she knew why I was there – to rescue somebody,” says Jacquie.

It meant they had to rethink their plans and act fast.

“We had to storm the villa by paying a taxi driver to ram the gates,” she says. They freed the woman and headed for India with the Pakistani army in pursuit. Going as far as they could in a vehicle they then walked across the mountains.

 

 

“We were trained and quite fit, but I've got a pregnant woman who's been beaten, starved and has a pair of flip-flops on. To me she was the real hero.”

Happily, they managed to dodge the gunfire in Kashmir and were able to bring the woman home.

Jacquie says there have been two big changes over her three decades in the industry.

More women are now signing up, though they still make up only one in 10 bodyguards in the UK.

The business also has a much higher public profile now. “Because of terrorism, security is in people's minds,” she says.

This political instability, coupled with an upsurge in the super-rich in the Middle East, China and elsewhere has driven the growth of the sector in recent years.

Figures from the Confederation of European Security Services show there are more than 230,000 people employed in the security services industry in the UK – and 1.9 million in the EU, with 44,000 security companies operating in the sector in Europe alone. Though only a fraction of these will actually be working as bodyguards.

 

 

In the UK, the Security Industry Authority (SIA) is the industry regulatory body responsible for personal licensing and private security regulations, and all newcomers need to do a training course first.

Which is fine as far as it goes, says Jacquie, but points out that “you're never going to come off a course and be a bodyguard or close protection operative immediately”.

Anybody working in personal protection needs to remember that they are not the client's friend. “You just have to maintain that slight apartness so you can be there when they need it and pull back when they don't,” she says.

Jacquie herself is now the subject of an upcoming Netflix film, Close. The action-thriller starring Noomi Rapace was inspired by Jacquie's life as a bodyguard and she was a consultant on the film.

Director Vicky Jewson has said that working with Jacquie “allowed us to bring an authenticity to the action scenes which was very important to me”.

XXXXXXXXXX

Despite the stereotype of burly security men in dark glasses, the essence of being a bodyguard is brains not brawn, Jacquie insists.

Recruits need to learn the softer skills of the business to work with clients. For instance, which knife and fork to use in a Michelin restaurant and how to have afternoon tea at the Ritz while blending into the background.

You also need to keep up with current affairs, she advises. “You have to be able to talk about the Nasdaq, not The Only Way Is Essex.”

She's not dismissive of the personal risks that are occasionally involved but says you can't worry going into a job.

“You do the job you're trained to do. When you come out, that's when you go, ‘Oh my God, what have I just done?'”

Listen to the whole interview with Jacquie Davis on Business Daily.

By Tim Bowler

 

 

The Art Of Becoming A killer Negotiator in Nine Steps

(qlmbusinessnews.com via telegraph.co.uk – – Sat, 22 Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

Negotiating is something we do on a daily basis, be it at work or at home, and is key to ensuring that you always get the best outcome.

According to the late soul singer Marvin Gaye, “Negotiation means getting the best of your opponent”. But negotiation is an art form that is hard to learn and even harder to master.

We've cherry-picked the most powerful tips for becoming a killer negotiator from Quora, the global question and answer network, to find the secret to getting what you want, every time.

1. Always be prepared
“You need to know as much as you can about the other party/topic/project”, explains Sebastian Amieva, a Quora poster who studied negotiation at Harvard Law School.

Fellow Quora poster Margaret Weiss agrees: “Negotiation is about the other party. It's not about you. You can be the best orator in the world – concise, convincing, eloquent – but if the other party cannot relate to you, regardless of your skills, all of those efforts will be in vain.

“The first thing that negotiators do is research their target audience – and based on the information gathered they adjust their pitch to the exact expectations of the other party. This research is what makes a person a good negotiator: the ability to connect to the needs of the other party, and the ability to speak on the same level.”

2. Remain objective
“A mediator must remain objective in discussing issues, even if they dislike some or all of the parties to the negotiation,” says Shane Dempsey, a professional mediator.

Even if you don't like the other parties involved, they should still receive professionalism and courtesy, Ms Dempsey added.

3. Use open-ended questions

According to behavioural science expert Craig Dos Santos, asking open-ended questions is key to negotiating, as it gets the other party talking, “so you can learn more, listen more, and figure out what is driving their thought process”.

“Don't ask questions that start with verbs. “Is that okay?” or “Is the budget proposal correct?” Instead try, “How can we improve this?” or “What changes are needed in the budget proposal?”

4. Don't talk too much
By listening more and talking less, negotiators are able to develop a detailed understanding of the needs of the other person.

“The best negotiator that I've known really didn't talk much,” says Yishan Wong, a former chief executive of Reddit whose Quora post on this topic received almost 2,000 upvotes (or “likes”). “He would just ask you questions about what you wanted and listen really carefully.

“People like to talk about what they want and how they feel about it, so they will tend to go on about things if you let them, and he would just let them do that, all the while listening really carefully.

“He would then go away and figure out how to structure the right deal given the resources/abilities at his (or his company's) disposal, and then present them with a deal,” adds Mr Wong. “He didn't need to talk them into it very much, the key seemed to be all about getting into their heads to find out what kind of deal would be most appealing to them.”

5. Force a ‘no' out of your opponent
Mr Dos Santos has a contrarian approach to negotiation. “When you get a ‘no' you have a real answer,” he says. “Being open to (or even inviting) ‘no' is respecting the other side's ability to make a choice. Often yes answers are actually maybes, and they also don't give you information about the boundaries.

“A simple example: someone offers you £95,000, and you ask for £100,000. They say yes. What did you learn? Could you have asked for more? Should you have asked for something else instead?”

Mr Dos Santos claims that the key to asking the harder questions is being able to bring the person back after ‘no'. “Hard questions introduce tension, and your ability to ask them is gated by your ability to reduce that tension by making the other party feel okay/better,” he says. “Notice the focus on emotion.”

6. Give them options
“Humans have a basic need for autonomy. If our ability to choose is restricted, we rebel,” claims Quora poster Brandon Villano.

“Come up with a few options that are favorable to you, and give them the opportunity to select which one they want. This is very powerful because it makes them feel much more in control (while still satisfying your requirements).

“All in all remember it's a win/win situation you are looking to achieve. You want the other party to feel good about the decision they made and happy that they got what they wanted. If you always come out on top with others feeling cheated, you build a bad reputation and this will make others wary of attempting a transaction with you.”

7. Fake empathy
“The other day a friend pinged me because he wanted a discount on an Airbnb rental,” writes Mr Dos Santos. “It was £2,700 and he wanted it for £2,000. Instead of just offering £2,000, which would mean the owner would have to fight an internal battle over what the place was actually worth, I helped him over-empathise with her.”

The friend drafted an email that read: “The place is gorgeous. I loved the photos and I would love to stay there. It's probably worth more than £2,700 and your price is a steal. However, I'm on a company budget, and I can only pay £2,000.”

This is a counter-intuitive approach: this individual has admitted that the asking price is fair and even said that it might be worth more. However, by using emotional manipulation, he got his deal. “He didn't fight her on valuation, and he made her feel good about the place,” says Mr Dos Santos. “He got the discount. £700 in 10 minutes with one email.”

8. Fix a deadline for negotiations to end

Rather than allowing negotiations to go on interminably, fix a reasonable deadline to get the deal done.

“It is very helpful to have some deadline/expiration date to create a forcing function for the negotiators,” says entrepreneur Kacy Qua. “If you are negotiating on behalf of an organisation and you come out of the negotiation too quickly, your side will think you didn't put up a strong enough fight.

“Having a deadline also provides a point from which you can work backward, so that you can time the flow of agreements/proposal rejections.”

9. Volunteer for The Samaritans
“The FBI often trains hostage negotiators by sending them to crisis/suicide hotlines for a year,” says Mr Dos Santos. “This is a process I'm currently going through myself. Why? Because it's the ultimate training ground for focusing on someone's emotions, and moving them from A to B. And it's hugely rewarding work.”

By Sophie Christie

 

 

US trade war with China intensifies new imposed $200bn tariffs on imports

(qlmbusinessnews.com via news.sky.com– Tue, 18th Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

Donald Trump says further tariffs worth $267bn (£203bn) will be placed on Chinese imports if Beijing takes “retaliatory action”.

Donald Trump has intensified America's trade war with China by imposing new $200bn (£152bn) tariffs on imports.

The higher import taxes will start from Monday at 10% before rising to 25% on 1 January, the White House announced.

The US president said there would be further tariffs on $267bn (£203bn) in Chinese imports if Beijing takes “retaliatory action against our farmers or other industries”.

“Once again, I urge China's leaders to take swift action to end their country's unfair trade practices,” Mr Trump said.

“Hopefully, this trade situation will be resolved, in the end, by myself and President Xi of China, for whom I have great respect and affection.”

Mr Trump has threatened to target all $500bn (£380bn) of Chinese imports unless Beijing agrees to sweeping changes to its intellectual property practices and what his administration alleges are unfair trade practices.

China denies the allegations and has vowed to hit back with tariffs on $60bn (£45bn) in American goods.

The new tariffs reportedly apply to more than 5,000 items including handbags, rice and textiles.

In a victory for Apple and its US customers, smart watches and some other consumer electronics products were removed from the latest list.

In a statement, Mr Trump insisted China's trade practices “plainly constitute a grave threat to the long-term health and prosperity of the United States economy”.

The US had already imposed 25% tariffs on $50bn (£38bn) in Chinese imports.

Mr Trump said: “For months, we have urged China to change these unfair practices, and give fair and reciprocal treatment to American companies.

“We have been very clear about the type of changes that need to be made, and we have given China every opportunity to treat us more fairly. But, so far, China has been unwilling to change its practices.”

Mr Trump has previously complained about America's massive trade deficit – $336bn (£255bn) last year – with China, its biggest trading partner.

 

 

Mining Bitcoin: Inside a cryptocurrency mining epicenter operation

 

Youtube/CBS News

As cryptocurrency mining evolves into a global industry, the gold rush for cheap energy is disrupting a small town in Washington State—home to some of the lowest electricity rates in the country. Here, two of the biggest Bitcoin mining operations in the U.S., Giga Watt and Salcido Enterprises, reveal their new and rapidly expanding mining operations, and explain the potential of super-computing—from blockchain to artificial intelligence.
But not everyone in town is on-board. Fearing their power rates will go up, and the culture of their town would change forever, many want to put the brakes on this new, disruptive industry.

 

The 10 top most lucrative occupations in the Uk you can do from home

(qlmbusinessnews.com via telegraph.co.uk – – Sun, 16th Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

The number of people working from home has surged in recent years, fueled by the economic downturn forcing many Britons out of their traditional office jobs, and technological advances making it easier for people to work remotely.

The Office for National Statistics puts the number of home workers at around four million, a 19pc increase over the past decade.

Jobs site Indeed has identified the top 10 most lucrative freelance occupations in Britain, ranked by annual salaries.

1. Development Operations Engineer – £59,449
Development operations (DevOps) engineers are typically responsible for the production and ongoing maintenance of a website platform, so are generally required to know how to code.

Because DevOps spend almost all of their time on a computer, it's easy to work from home, with the occasional office visit to catch up with team members.

 

 

2. User Experience Researcher – £46,004
User experience (UX) researchers spend their time gathering data from consumers for business clients, so that the latter can better understand their customer's behaviour.

This is done through qualitative and quantitative methods, including interviews and surveys – all of which can take place away from an office environment.

3. Freelance Quantity Surveyor – £44,950
Quantity surveyors manage all of the constructions costs relating to building projects, and can either work in an office or on-site. Freelancers can of course carry out much of their work from the comfort of their home, while maintaining regular visits to their construction sites.

4. Proposal Writer – £38,436
Whether for a business or individual, proposal writers create written documents designed to convince the recipient to enter a business arrangement or buy a product. This can all be done on a computer, enabling the writer to work remotely.

 

 

5. Software Developer – £32,740
Software developers, also known as a computer programmers, are responsible for designing, installing, testing and maintaining software systems.

While developers usually work in teams with engineers and managers, it is feasible for them to work from home with regular calls to colleagues.

6. Social Media Manager – £32,424
As the name suggests, social media managers must come up with engaging media marketing campaigns for clients and post the content on platforms such as LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest.

All of this can be done on a laptop or phone, so doesn't require a person to work from an office.

7. Online Tutor – £29,000
Online tutors (or “e-tutors”) educate and support students learning a particular course, just like a normal tutor, but on the Internet.

Tutors can guide and support students through a course via social media and email, and can even offer services such as “virtual classrooms” through Skype.

 

 

8. Copy Editor – £28,836
Copy editors are responsible for scanning documents for grammar, spelling and punctuation, as well as fact-checking, and then making any necessary edits.

This can all be done at home, and copy editors often combine this work with freelance writing to bring in extra money.

9. Content Producer – £28,615
Content producers create and publish written content for different websites and digital platforms.

Everything is done online and communication is most effective via email, making it an ideal job to carry out at home.

10. Event planner – £25,811
While event planning isn't as well paid as many jobs that require you to work in an office, those in the profession will save on travel costs by working from home, where they can easily communicate with clients and vendors on the phone or by email.

By Sophie Christie

 

 

This exceptional make-up artist’s surreal work made her an Instagram hit

 

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 15th Sept 2018) London, Uk – –
Make-up artist Romanie-Jade Tulloch has amassed nearly 160,000 Instagram followers on her account with her surreal designs.

The 19-year-old, from Nottingham, said the artworks can take up to five hours to create.

Ms Tulloch, now an “Instagram influencer”, was awarded a Prince's Trust loan to get her career as a make-up artist off the ground.

At the same time her social media page “blew up”, she said, and now hopes to turn her hobby into a full-time job.

 

The rent parties from 1920s Harlem making a revival in the UK

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 8 Sept, 2018) London, Uk – –

Rent parties were held in 1920s New York when African Americans faced disproportionately high rents. They threw wild jazz parties for paying guests to make up the money before the rent collector came round.

British choreographer Darren Pritchard is putting on performances inspired by these rent parties, to highlight housing inequalities in the UK today.

 

TSB boss Paul Pester to get bonus despite resigning over IT chaos

(qlmbusinessnews.com via telegraph.co.uk – – Tue, 4th Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

TSB’s outgoing boss Paul Pester is still in line for payments and bonuses of nearly £1.7m, despite standing down today following criticism of his handling of a bungled IT switch earlier in the year that left thousands of customers unable to access their accounts for days.

Mr Pester, who was singled out for harshly worded criticism by MPs on the Treasury select committee, will leave with immediate effect.

He will get a £1.2m severance payment and a bonus of up to £480,000 that was determined prior to TSB's takeover by Spanish bank Sabadell in 2015. Other variable compensation will be frozen subject to investigations.

TSB said Mr Pester would be paid “in line with the bank’s remuneration policy and the terms of his contract”, with any bonus dependent on the “outcome of performance conditions as well as ongoing regulatory and independent investigations”.

The outgoing boss has already given up a bonus worth £2m that was directly related to the delivery of the IT project – a move Mr Meddings said was “wholly appropriate” earlier this year.

The news follows a second outage over the weekend that again left some customers struggling to use the bank’s online services.

 

 

Profile | Who is Paul Pester?

CREDIT: PA
Ex-TSB boss Paul Pester was once hailed as the “luckiest man in banking” after he narrowly avoided taking the top job at the Co-operative Bank, shortly before it found a black hole in its accounts.

But he’s probably not feeling so fortuitous now, after a bungled switchover of TSB's IT systems in April left some customers unable to access their accounts. The bank is now being investigated by the Financial Conduct Authority and is shelling out millions for compensation payouts. Pester has now stood down from the job after seven years.

A doctor of theoretical physics and regular triathlete, Pester spent his early working life in consulting before taking the reins at Virgin Money, at the time a provider of savings and investment plans, in 1999.

He has since worked at Santander and run the comparison site Moneyfacts, but it’s Lloyds Banking Group that has loomed over the most dramatic moments of his career.

Having previously run what was then Lloyds TSB’s consumer arm, Pester returned to his old employer in 2010, not long after it was nearly sunk by its decision to buy HBOS during the financial crisis.

There he was put in charge of Project Verde, Lloyd's plan to sell off 636 branches in order to comply with European state aid rules that kicked in after it was bailed out by the British government.

The plan had originally been to sell the branches to the Co-op Bank, with Pester becoming head of the combined group. But in February 2013 the mutual pulled out, forcing Lloyds to float TSB on the stock market instead.

Pester pitched it as an opportunity to build a bank without the scandalous baggage that has bogged down the industry’s big players, with a focus on “local banking” and transparency. He remained in charge when TSB was taken private by Spanish lender Sabadell in 2015.

In 2017 he said the switch from Lloyds’ IT systems would be a moment of “liberation” for TSB as it stepped out from the shadow of its former owner.

But now the keen surfer has found himself upended in choppy waters.

Richard Meddings, TSB’s chairman, will take on executive responsibilities until a successor is appointed.

Mr Meddings said: “Although there is more to do to achieve full stability for customers, the bank’s IT systems and services are much improved since the IT migration. Paul and the board have therefore agreed that this is the right time to appoint a new CEO for TSB.”

In June the Treasury committee said it had “lost confidence” in Mr Pester over his handling of the IT outage and called upon TSB’s board to consider his position.

He had led the bank since 2011 and oversaw its spin out from Lloyds Banking Group in 2013.

 

 

Despite the problems, Mr Pester insisted on Tuesday that the bank had “achieved real success in creating a bank which is truly consumer-focused, attracting customers from the UK’s established banks, and growing TSB’s balance sheet from c.£18bn to around £31bn today”.

TSB faces an investigation and possible fine over the outage from City watchdog the Financial Conduct Authority and has also hired law firm Slaughter & May for its own internal probe into what went wrong.

It is recruiting hundreds of additional staff to tackle a backlog of complaints, with more than 1,300 customers having become victims of fraud.

TSB said in its interim results earlier this year that the fiasco had cost it £176m in just over three months.

By Jack Torrance

 

 

Sir James Dyson to invest £2bn in electric car test facilities in the UK

(qlmbusinessnews.com via telegraph.co.uk – – Thu, 30th Aug 2018) London, Uk – –

Sir James Dyson is gearing up his £2bn attempt to build an electric car with a huge investment in new test facilities in the UK.

The billionaire entrepreneur is applying for planning permission to build a series of test tracks at the World War II airbase in Wiltshire his company acquired last year.

Dyson has already created a technology centre at Hullavington airfield with the restoration and repurposing of two giant aircraft hangars.

Now Sir James wants to build 10 miles of tracks on the 520-acre site which will be used to examine cars’ performance when tackling corners, high speeds and inclines, as well as their ability to handle off-road driving.

The application also include plans to create 45,000sq m of buildings capable of accommodating 2,000 people, work which will take Dyson’s spending on the site to more than £200m so far.

Last September Sir James confirmed long-rumoured plans his company – which has earned him a £9.5bn fortune – had been working on an electric car for three years. The admission came because Dyson needed to start discussions with governments about testing.

He has refused to give details of what the vehicle might look like, saying only that the design will be “radical”, feature basic self-driving technology and be aimed at upmarket buyers.

Dyson has not partnered with existing car manufacturers, preferring to go it alone and develop the advanced electric motors and batteries it created for its vacuum cleaners and driers for use in cars. The company also has extensive experience in aerodynamics and robotics, as well as manufacturing.

There has been speculation that Dyson – which bought US battery research business Sakti3 in 2015 – has made a breakthrough in battery technology that will give it an edge over other automotive manufacturers.

Sir James has set a tough timeline for the car, aiming to have it ready by 2021.

About 400 people are working on the car at the moment and Dyson is currently recruiting a further 300 into automotive roles. Sir James has predicted that as work on the project accelerates, Dyson’s current UK workforce of 4,800 could almost double.

During the war Allied pilots used Hullavington as a base from where they could develop an understanding of how to fly their aircraft to the limit, making them more effective in combat.

Sir James said he hoped to repeat such efforts at the site. “Hullavington is filled with the spirit of engineering, innovation and risk-taking,” he said. “These are the ideals that drove those who worked on the airfield before us, and they will help propel us forward as we develop our electric vehicle.”

Jim Rowan, chief executive, said Hullavington will “quickly become a world-class vehicle testing campus, creating high-skilled jobs for Britain as our automotive project strengthens our credentials as a global R&D organisation”.

If Sir James can develop a workable vehicles – something automotive experts say could cost tens of billions – Britain is unlikely to see production of it here.

His company – which has more than 12,000 staff worldwide – carries out manufacturing in low-cost Far East, with the engineering and development work focused on the UK.

Sir James’s inspiration to build an environmentally friendly car came more than 20 years ago as he used filters from his early vacuums to try to improve diesel exhausts. He said his pleas to reduce emissions using his innovative technology were turned down.

By Alan Tovey

 

 

Is the traditional 9 to 5 work day becoming a thing of the past?


(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sun, 26 Aug, 2018) London, Uk – –

Traditional workplace hours of 9am to 5pm are now only the norm for a minority of workers, research suggests.

Just 6% of people in the UK now work such hours, a YouGov survey found.

Almost half of people worked flexibly with arrangements such as job sharing or compressed hours, allowing them to juggle other commitments, it found.

Anna Whitehouse, a campaigner whose own flexible working request was refused by her employer, said there were still misconceptions about such arrangements.

In her case, her employer refused her request for 15 minutes flexibility at the start and end of each day to enable her to drop off and pick up her children from nursery.

“They denied it because they said it would open the floodgates for other people to request the same thing.”

Mrs Whitehouse, an author and blogger known as Mrs Pukka, said the refusal prompted her to resign and blog about the experience.

“My background is as a journalist so I just started writing. I'm not a campaigner or an activist, but I had a moment of frustration and went with it.”

Since then she has started the Flex Appeal, aimed at convincing firms to trial flexible working and also to make people aware of their right to request flexible working.

“It's not about parents, it's about people. There's so much research out there showing working flexibly is better for mental health and for productivity,” she said.

Polling firm YouGov surveyed over 4,000 adults for the survey, which was commissioned by fast-food chain McDonald's.

How to request flexible working
Every employee in the UK has the statutory right to request flexible working after 26 weeks of employment.

Requests should be in writing, stating the date of the request and whether any previous application has been made and the date of that application.

Requests and appeals must be considered and decided upon within three months of the receipt of the request.

Employers must have a sound business reason for rejecting any request.

Employees can only make one request in any 12-month period.

The study found most full-time workers would like to start work at 8am and finish by 4pm, hours chosen by 37% of those surveyed. The second most popular choice was 7am to 3pm, chosen by 21% of those surveyed.

It found flexibility was important to people of all ages and life stages, including parents and students, for example.

Those who did work flexibly said it improved their motivation and encouraged them to stay in a job for longer.

Peter Cheese, chief executive of HR industry body the CIPD, said organisations willing to offer flexible working would attract a higher number of applicants.

But he said more firms needed to step up: “Uptake of flexible working is still low and most jobs are not advertised as being open to different working arrangements,” he said.

By Katie Hope

 

Elon Musk explain controversial tweet about taking Tesla private

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Fri, 17th Aug 2018) London, Uk – –

Elon Musk has attempted to explain his controversial tweet about taking Tesla private, saying he was “not on weed” at the time.

The electric carmaker's founder has been facing intense scrutiny about the 7 August tweet which said he wanted to take Tesla private at $420 a share.

He told the New York Times that the price of $420 seemed like “better karma” than $419.

“But I was not on weed, to be clear,” he said.

4/20 is an infamous term, more common in the US, that refers to the consumption of cannabis.

The price of $419 would have represented a 20% premium over Tesla's share price at the time.

Musk in the hot seat again
Tesla founder playing a dangerous game
“It seemed like better karma at $420 than at $419. But I was not on weed, to be clear. Weed is not helpful for productivity. There's a reason for the word ‘stoned'. You just sit there like a stone on weed,” Mr Musk, 47, told the paper.

His tweet sparked a sharp rally in Tesla's share price, but has also prompted scrutiny. The stock closed at $335.45 in New York on Thursday.

Fox News has reported that the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had sent subpoenas to the electric carmaker and was “ramping up” its investigation into the tweet.

Mr Musk also said he sent the tweet while driving in a Tesla Model S to the airport and that he did not regret sending it.

‘No sleep, or Ambien'
He also told the New York Times that friends had expressed concern that he was exhausted after working 120 hour weeks: “This past year has been the most difficult and painful year of my career. It was excruciating.”

The company is facing pressure to increase production of its Model 3 car and in May Mr Musk stopped one analyst during a results call by saying “boring bonehead questions are not cool”.

The paper reported that at times during the interview he stopped speaking, seemingly overcome by emotion – and that he spent the full 24 hours of his birthday on 28 June working. “All night – no friends, nothing,” Mr Musk said.

The company is also facing legal actions about its business practices. In the latest complaint, a former employee at its Nevada battery factory filed a whistleblower complaint with the SEC accusing the company of spying on employees.

Tesla said it had taken the complaints by Karl Hansen seriously but after investigating had failed to substantiate them.

In the New York Times interview, Mr Musk said that he took the sedative Ambien to help him sleep when he was not working: “It is often a choice of no sleep, or Ambien.”

According to the New York Times his use of the drug has concerned some board members, who wonder if it affects his late night tweets.

In May Roseanne Barr blamed Ambien for her tweet that likened Valerie Jarrett, an African-American former aide to Barack Obama, to an ape.

‘They can have the job'
Tesla's directors said: “There have been many false and irresponsible rumours in the press about the discussions of the Tesla board. We would like to make clear that Elon's commitment and dedication to Tesla is obvious.

“Over the past 15 years, Elon's leadership of the Tesla team has caused Tesla to grow from a small start-up to having hundreds of thousands of cars on the road that customers love, employing tens of thousands of people around the world, and creating significant shareholder value in the process.”

The statement was issued by the board members, excluding Mr Musk, who controls about a fifth of Tesla shares.

The board has set up a committee to evaluate any take-private proposal from Mr Musk, who has said that he discussed funding a deal with the Saudi Arabian sovereign wealth fund.

The New York Times reported that Mr Musk did not intend to separate the roles of chairman and chief executive, but that a search was underway to recruit a deputy. However, he said there was “no active search” underway.

He added: “If you have anyone who can do a better job, please let me know. They can have the job. Is there someone who can do the job better? They can have the reins right now.”

 

 

The Charmed and Glamorous Life of a Pro Gamer

 

At age 20, professional gamer Michael Schmale had it all: a steady salary, a team mansion overlooking Hollywood and a chef, personal trainer, coach and team manager who were all there to help him play at his best. But the job came with plenty of uncertainties too. This is a series about careers of the future hosted by Bloomberg Technology's Aki Ito.

Video by David Nicholson and Victoria Blackburne-Daniell

 

How door knocking changed this young man’s life from east London to the City

 

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 11 Aug 2018) London, Uk – –

Reggie Nelson was fed up with the world around him after his dad died. An inspirational chat led to Reggie deciding to take a risk knocking on the doors of the wealthy to find out how they amassed their wealth. One day a door opened.

This is his story.

Produced and Filmed by Cebo Luthuli

 

Tai Lopez Top 10 Rules for Success

 

Youtube/Evan Carmichael

Grab a snack and chew on today's lessons from a man who went from a college dropout, and being completely broke (sleeping on his mom's couch) to working in the world of finance, being involved with more than 20 multi-million dollar businesses, and starting one of the world's largest book clubs that reaches 1.5 million people! He's Tai Lopez and here's my take on his Top 10 Rules for Success.

Tai Lopez. He began the habit of reading for the search of what he calls the “Good Life”. He helped Joel Salatin pioneer grass-fed, sustainable agriculture on Polyface Farms. He's a founder, investor, advisor, or mentor to more than 20 multi-million dollar businesses. He appeared on various TV and radio shows, spoke at top global universities like The London Business School. He's a college dropout. He summarized all he has learned from his mentors and compiled them into a series he calls, “The 67 Steps”. He was voted the Number 1 Social Media Influencer by Entrepreneur Magazine. He has over 1m subscribers on YouTube. He started one of the world's largest book clubs that reaches 1.5 million people! He has interviewed Kobe Bryant, Rihanna, Jordan Belfort, Mark Cuban & more.

 

 

How Ben Francis Started The UK’s Fastest Growing Company Gymshark

 

Youtube/Gymshark

Gymshark has been my entire life since I started it as a teenager. After being awarded the UK's fastest growing company by the Fastrack 100 in the Times newspaper, I've decided to document my journey.

My first video is a brief explanation of how Gymshark started, and the work we had to put in to get it to where it is today.