John Paul DeJoria : Overcoming Homelessness Twice to Become a Billionaire

John Paul Dejoria has had a rough ride to the top. Yet being homeless twice and being abandoned by his wife early on didn’t shake his drive to make it in this word, and he’s managed to turn an admittedly difficult hand into a royal flush. These days he’s a billionaire several times over with a successful Paul Mitchell haircare line and even a founding stake in Patron tequila brand. So how did he maintain motivation? He remembered giving two dimes to the Salvation Army as a boy, and how his mother told him that those dimes add up and can really help people. This lesson directly helped him overcome a period early in his career where he was collecting bottle caps to get money to eat.

 

Inside Tommy Hilfiger’s Stunning $50 Million Penthouse in the Plaza Hotel

Iconic fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger and his wife Dee take us on a home tour of their duplex penthouse apartment at the Plaza Hotel overlooking Central Park. Hilfiger’s NYC penthouse suite has been home to The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and Marilyn Monroe. His office even features an authentic New York Times sign

 

New Orleans all-female motorcycle club empowering women everywhere

 

They’re bold, chic, and they can shred the streets of New Orleans in a pair of stilettos. Meet the Caramel Curves, an all-female motorcycle club focused on empowering and uplifting women. After feeling removed from the culture of all-male bike clubs, co-founders Tru and Coco got together to start their own movement. Now, every time they ride, the Caramel Curves demand respect, standing as a role model for girls everywhere.

 

Nelson Mandela’s Top 10 Rules For Success

 

He was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician, and philanthropist.

He served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999.

He is held in deep respect within South Africa, and he’s often described as the “Father of the Nation”.

He’s Nelson Mandela and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.

 

 

The senior letting older entrepreneurs know It’s never too late to reinvent yourself

 

It’s never too late to reinvent yourself. Take it from Paul Tasner — after working continuously for other people for 40 years, he founded his own start-up at age 66, pairing his idea for a business with his experience and passion. And he’s not alone. As he shares in this short, funny and inspirational talk, seniors are increasingly indulging their entrepreneurial instincts — and seeing great success.

 

 

 

How Greg Cox sports injury led to a successful business career

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 17 Feb 2018) London, Uk – –

When a serious injury ended Greg Cox’s hopes of making it as a professional rugby player, little did he know that it would set him on the path to making a fortune in business.

On the books of top English club Wasps back in 1999, the then 18-year-old was playing regularly for the second team, and had been called up by the England Under 19s squad.

Then one rainy evening training session Mr Cox says he twisted his knee ligaments “and that was that”.

“I had a full knee operation, and I did return to Wasps the next year,” he says. “But still recovering from the injury I couldn’t apply myself as much when I came back. And you have to be 100% committed [to be successful at rugby].”

So realising that his contract was not going to be renewed he left the club, swapping rugby for working on building sites.

“I was earning £300 a week cash in hand, which when you are living at home isn’t bad, but I was looking for something else to do, and thinking ‘how can I earn more money?’.”

Soon Mr Cox swapped being a bricklayer for the life of a serial entrepreneur, moving from importing cars, to property investments, and then into the world of finance.

Since 2009 he has been the founder and chief executive of Quint Group, which owns a number of financial technology or “fintech” businesses, and today has an annual turnover of £42m.

“I think I have always been entrepreneurial, I was always selling things to other pupils at school… and I’ve always had a real drive,” says Mr Cox, now 36.

Educated at a private school in the south west of England, he had gained good enough A-levels to go to university, but instead chose to try a career in rugby.

When things didn’t work out at Wasps, he didn’t think of making a late arrival at college. Instead while working on those building sites he came up with his first big moneymaking idea – importing cars.

“There was an article in the Sunday Times all about how to import a car from Europe and save money,” he says. “At the time there was a big hoo-ha in the press about cars in Europe being 20% cheaper than in the UK.

“So I thought that this was a really good idea for a business, so I created a company to help people import cars from Europe.”

Remembering how to program computers from his school days Mr Cox quickly built a website and started to import up to 400 cars a month, even handling work for much larger firms such as Virgin Cars.

“What many people didn’t realise is that you could simply go to a car dealer in Germany or Belgium and they’d be quite happy to sell you a right hand drive car. It wasn’t as if people would have to put up with a left hand drive vehicle.”

For the next two to three years business boomed for Mr Cox and his company Coszt Imports “despite the terrible name”.

But then a combination of the dotcom bubble bursting in 2001, and the pound going up in value meant that the business went bust.

“I felt dented pride and a bit stupid, I guess,” he says. “I had dived into it, and I didn’t know how to run a business at that age.

“Obviously you think you are invincible at 21, but I learned a lot from it. I had racked up quite a bit of debt as a result of it all, so I just had to go straight back to work.”

So licking his wounds, Mr Cox moved to South Africa, and thanks to the weakness of that country’s currency, he started to once again export cars to the UK. He then expanded into property investments.

By 2008 Mr Cox was back in the UK and investing in the fintech sector when together with a friend and business partner called Paul Naden they launched Quint Group in January of the following year.

Both investing £12,500, Mr Cox says that he saw a big opportunity to set up a number of consumer finance websites. Brands owned by Quint include Monevo, an online marketplace that connects lenders with consumers that wish to borrow money, and price comparison website Moneyguru.

Based in Macclesfield, in Cheshire in the north of England, Quint makes most of its money by charging lenders a commission, and it also has a data business called Infinian.

Mr Cox today owns 90% of Quint after buying out his co-founder last year. The company now has 100 employees, and overseas offices in Poland, China, South Africa, and the US, as it continues with its international expansion plans.

Richard Bell, north west editor of business news publisher Bdaily, says that “given the level of growth that Quint has achieved over the past couple of years… I’m keen to see where they are headed. Exciting business with switched-on leadership.”

Mr Cox is, however, happy to admit that it hasn’t all been plain sailing at Quint, with an unsuccessful insurance business being closed down.

“When something doesn’t work we stop it and do something else,” he says.

“My advice to anyone wanting to start a business is: Focus on what you are good at, work relentlessly at it, make considered decisions, don’t be too emotive, and with a bit of luck you’ll have some success.”

By Will Smale

 

 

The Entrepreneur Making Tantalizing Hand-crafted Food Inspired beauty products

 

A food-inspired range of beauty products is tantalizing senses across the country. BathKandy’s skincare range of products are hand-crafted using only natural, organic ingredients. And as an added bonus, they look and smell delicious.

 

 

Moorea Seal: A Female Entrepreneur’s Journey

 

 

In celebration of International Women’s Day,  sharing about inspiring everyday women

Helping to amplify the voices of females—filmmakers, photographers, foodies, architects, and brand makers. Let’s inspire more women to share their work with more people to support one another.

 

 

Successful Shark Tank Businesses That Went on to Make Millions

 

Budding entrepreneurs get the chance to bring their dreams to fruition in this reality show from executive producer Mark Burnett. They present their ideas to the sharks in the tank — five titans of industry who made their own dreams a reality and turned their ideas into lucrative empires. The contestants try to convince any one of the sharks to invest money in their idea. When more than one of the sharks decide they want a piece of the action, a bidding war can erupt, driving up the price of the investment.

 

Jack Ma the richest man in Asia

 

Jack Ma wasn’t born rich but now he is the richest man in Asia. This profile tells the story of how Ma started as a poor kid in China’s countryside, learned English, got rejected from a job at KFC but then went on to found Alibaba, the massive e-commerce site.

 

 

How getting fired, turned Melissa Ben-Ishay passion for baking cupcakes into a successful business

 

Entrepreneur

When Melissa Ben-Ishay got fired, she immediately called her brother. He encouraged her to go home, bake her famous cupcakes and reassured her they would figure out how to turn her hobby into a business. Within a week, Baked by Melissa was up and running. Fourteen stores and a cookbook later, Melissa’s bite-size treats are a huge success. She sat down with Jessica Abo to talk about her company’s growth, the friends who helped her get here and what she’s created to help you celebrate Valentine’s Day.

 

 

 

Will Smith shares his success philosophy

 

He’s the only actor to have eight consecutive films gross over $100 million in the domestic box office. He has been ranked as the most bankable star worldwide by Forbes. As of 2016, his films have grossed $7.5 billion at the global box office. For his performances in Ali, and in The Pursuit of Happyness, Smith received nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actor. He has won four Grammy Awards. He turned down the role of Neo in The Matrix in favor of Wild Wild West. In 2005, Smith was entered into the Guinness Book of World Records for attending three premieres in a 24-hour time span.

 

 

 

Ikea Swedish furniture founder Ingvar Kamprad has died at the age of 91

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Mon, 29 Jan 2018) London, Uk – –

The Swedish founder of the Ikea furniture chain, Ingvar Kamprad, has died at the age of 91, the company has announced.

Mr Kamprad – who pioneered flat-pack furniture – died at his home in Småland, Ikea confirmed in a statement.

The company said that Mr Kamprad was “one of the greatest entrepreneurs of the 20th century”.

The billionaire, who was born in 1926 in Småland, founded Ikea at the age of 17.

He used some money his father had given him as a gift for performing well at school despite his dyslexia.

In the later years of his life, Mr Kamprad faced questions over his past links to fascist groups – something he admitted, but said was a “mistake”.

In a statement on Sunday, Ikea said that Mr Kamprad had “peacefully passed away at his home”.

“He worked until the very end of his life, staying true to his own motto that most things remain to be done,” it added. Mr Kamprad eventually stepped down from the company’s board in 2013, at the age of 87.

“Ingvar Kamprad was a great entrepreneur of the typical southern Swedish kind – hardworking and stubborn, with a lot of warmth and a playful twinkle in his eye,” the company said.

His company’s designs became popular in part because of their simplicity and value.

Mr Kamprad is reported to have come up with the idea of flat-pack furniture after watching an employee remove the legs from a table in order to fit it into a customer’s car.

Furniture designer Jeff Banks said that Mr Kamprad’s creations radically changed how people made and designed products for the home.

“People have tried to reproduce and copy that, but unsuccessfully,” he said.

Mr Banks added that the designs produced and sold through the retailer made good use of recyclable products, adding that Mr Kamprad was “head and shoulders above the rest”.

Mr Kamprad was renowned for his devotion to frugality, reportedly driving an old Volvo and travelling by economy class.

In a 2016 interview with Swedish television channel TV4, Mr Kamprad said that it was “in the nature of Småland to be thrifty”.

“If you look at me now, I don’t think I’m wearing anything that wasn’t bought at a flea market,” he said.

He told the channel that he built his business on a “local ethos”.

“We have Småland in the blood, and we know what a krona is – even though it is not as much as it was when we bought candy and went to elementary school,” he said, referring to the Swedish currency.

People took to social media on Sunday to pay their respects to the “greatest Swedish entrepreneur to have ever lived”.

Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom tweeted her condolences, saying that Mr Kamprad had “put Sweden on the world map”.

Ikea: Key facts

  • Ikea started in 1943 and now has 389 stores worldwide
  • The name comes from Mr Kamprad’s initials (IK), together with the name of the farm he grew up on – Elmtaryd (E) – and the nearby village Agunnaryd (A)
  • The company’s retail sales totalled 36.4bn euros ($43bn, £30bn) in 2016
  • Its flat-pack furniture became iconic both for its affordability and for its picture-based assembly instructions

Ikea has remained privately-owned under a Dutch trust operated by the Kamprad family. Its complex business structure has drawn controversy and the European Commission said last year that it had launched an investigation into Ikea’s tax arrangements.

The European Green Party said that the arrangement had allowed the company to avoid paying some €1bn in tax between 2009 and 2014.

A spokesman for Dutch-based Inter Ikea, one of the company’s two divisions, said that the company had been taxed “in accordance with EU rules”.

In an interview in the 1980s, Mr Kamprad said that his vision for Ikea was that it would be a company that would make life easier for its customers.

In more recent years, Mr Kamprad had faced scrutiny over his past links to Nazi groups.

The tycoon revealed some elements of his past in a book in 1988, admitting that he was a close friend of the Swedish fascist activist Per Engdahl, and a member of his New Swedish Movement between 1942 and 1945.

He said that his involvement was youthful “stupidity” and the “greatest mistake” of his life.

But a 2011 book by Elisabeth Asbrink alleged details beyond what Mr Kamprad had previously admitted. She wrote that he was an active recruiter for a Swedish Nazi group, and stayed close to sympathisers well after World War Two.

At the time a spokesman for Mr Kamprad said he had long admitted flirting with fascism, but that there were now “no Nazi-sympathising thoughts in Ingvar’s head whatsoever”.

 

 

 

 

Mitch Langstein director for Cellular Accessories: Make Your Business Dream Your Reality

 

Mitch Langstein is the marketing director for Cellular Accessories. Mitch explains what entrepreneurship means to him and how he knew he wanted to be an entrepreneur out of college. Mitch talks about where he got the idea for his business and how he turned that idea into a reality!

 

Marcus Lemonis’s Top 10 Rules For Success

 

He’s an businessman, inventor, television personality and philanthropist. He is currently the chairman and CEO of Camping World and Good Sam Enterprises, and the star of The Profit, a CNBC reality show about saving small businesses. He leads close to 6,000 employees in over 100 cities across the US. He’s Marcus Lemonis and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK’s Youngest Millionaire Who Started His Online Business Whilst Studying For His A-levels

Akshay Ruparelia was just 17 years-old when he started his online business, all whilst studying for his A-levels and acting as a carer for his parents, who are both deaf. Akshay joins Holly and Phillip to talk about his business which is currently estimated to be worth over £12 million!