Secret Millionaire Star Kavita Oberoi Discusses her Success Journey

 

Youtube/Kavita Oberoi

(qlmbusinessnews.com via theguardian.com – – Sun, 8th July, 2018) London, Uk – –

Here the businesswoman discusses her journey and how giving back to society should always be part of an entrepreneur’s gameplan

People question whether entrepreneurs are born or made. For me, it was in my DNA. I grew up above my father’s plumbing shop in Bradford. He had moved to the UK from India with the intention of starting his own business and always said I brought him luck because he started to experience success when I came along. I have memories of being locked in the car with a bottle of milk while he went to business meetings. It wouldn’t happen today! Sadly, my father passed away when I was 15.

But my family didn’t want me to have an education and go out to work. They were very traditional and there was a lot of pressure – particularly from my extended family – to get married and stay at home. Some of those cultural expectations can still hold black and minority ethnic women back today. But from a young age, I have always fought against those barriers. I was never going to do what I was supposed to do. My mother is my biggest champion – when I was a child, she used to sneak me out of the house to go to ballet or tap lessons. She has always said: “I will support you, but don’t let me down.”

People question whether entrepreneurs are born or made. For me, it was in my DNA. I grew up above my father’s plumbing shop in Bradford. He had moved to the UK from India with the intention of starting his own business and always said I brought him luck because he started to experience success when I came along. I have memories of being locked in the car with a bottle of milk while he went to business meetings. It wouldn’t happen today! Sadly, my father passed away when I was 15.

But my family didn’t want me to have an education and go out to work. They were very traditional and there was a lot of pressure – particularly from my extended family – to get married and stay at home. Some of those cultural expectations can still hold black and minority ethnic women back today. But from a young age, I have always fought against those barriers. I was never going to do what I was supposed to do. My mother is my biggest champion – when I was a child, she used to sneak me out of the house to go to ballet or tap lessons. She has always said: “I will support you, but don’t let me down.”

 

 

It’s about being a driver for change and making the necessary compromises along the way. I did go to university (although I still lived at home and had to travel in every day) and I went on to develop a successful career in pharmaceutical sales with Bayer. By this time, I had probably been introduced to 10 potential husbands, all of whom I had rejected. But I did eventually marry a man my family approved of. His family were also very traditional, but I carried on working.

The turning point for me was when I didn’t get the promotion I wanted at work. I was looking to move into management at Bayer. I’d set a goal, as I always do, and I expected to reach it. When that didn’t happen, I sat there and thought: do I really want to go and work for somebody else for eight years, only to be told I’m not good enough? The answer was no. I set up my own healthcare and IT consultancy business, Oberoi Consulting, in 2001. I would later start the Oberoi Business Hub in 2012 to provide back-office support to small businesses, and received an OBE for services to entrepreneurship and startups in 2014.

One of my biggest challenges was learning to trust other people. It wasn’t a natural thing for me. Entrepreneurs are naturally very controlling individuals and I’d never had any people management experience when I was first starting out. I had to learn the hard way about creating and motivating high-performing teams. While mistakes can be frustrating for a perfectionist like me, it’s important to let staff learn from them, without a fear of failure or consequences. I am still learning every day about great leadership.

Giving something back should always be part of an entrepreneur’s game plan. In 2016, I got involved with an initiative to provide breakfast to primary school children in Derby, and funded it for a year to get it off the ground. We now have 16 schools involved, Kellogg’s is providing the cereal, and local businesses and Derby College are raising money. There’s already been an improvement in the children’s attendance, behaviour and attainment in class.

My biggest ambition is to inspire others, so they can achieve their potential. Self-belief is key for any business owner – you have to communicate the passion you have for your business, stay focused and be dedicated to your cause. Finding a mentor can help, as can spending time surrounded by like-minded, motivated individuals to keep your energy levels up. Above all, be prepared to sacrifice a lot. Failure is not an option.

Interview by Emma Sheppard

 

 

Meet The Founder of Halo Top a $2bn Low-calorie Ice Cream Success Story

Source: Youtube/CBS

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Fri, 7th July 2018) London, Uk – –

Just a few years ago Justin Woolverton was pleading with US supermarkets to keep his reduced calorie ice cream tubs in their freezer cabinets.

Sales of his low fat, low sugar brand Halo Top were flat-lining, and stores were continually threatening to stop stocking it.

“We were hanging on by the skin of our teeth,” says the 38-year-old, who launched the business in 2012. “We'd tell them ‘leave us up there, things are going to turn around'.”

In his wildest dreams Mr Woolverton couldn't have predicted just how dramatic the turnaround would be. Just six years after starting, his ice cream is now the best-selling brand in the US.

With very little money for marketing, the LA-based start-up had been trying to inch up sales by working hard to promote itself on social media.

Then in 2016 a journalist for GQ magazine wrote a very witty article about how he ate only Halo Top ice cream for 10 straight days.

The story went viral, and Halo Top's sales went through the roof.

In 2016 it was reported to have sold 28.8 million tubs, generating $132.4m (£101m) in revenues becoming the best-selling pint of ice cream in the US, beating iconic industry leaders such as Ben & Jerry's and Häagen-Dazs.

Not bad for a small independent business that has no outside investors, other than the family and friends of Mr Woolverton and his co-founder Doug Bouton.

Yet despite the brand's success, some critics have questioned the claimed health credentials of the “guilt free” ice cream. While others wonder if it should be allowed to call itself ice cream at all.

Before founding Halo Top, Mr Woolverton was working in Los Angeles as a corporate lawyer, a job with which he'd become disenchanted.

The idea for the ice cream came about because of restrictions he made to his diet to manage his blood sugar levels.

At home, instead of sugary treats, he'd have a bowl of Greek yogurt with fruit, to which he would add the sweetener stevia.

After buying a $20 ice cream maker he put the mixture through it to see what it would taste like. “It was delicious. So from there, it was like: ‘Holy cow, if I like this why wouldn't other people like it?'.”

Mr Woolverton then started experimenting with ingredients, including replacing the yogurt with milk, to make the concoction behave more like ice cream when frozen and enable it to be produced on a mass scale.

 

“It honestly took a year of complete failure at the beginning,” he says.

With friend Doug Bouton, another former lawyer on board, they launched the business with money borrowed from family and friends, student loans and £150,000 of credit card debt.

Mr Woolverton says that not having any private equity investors has given him and Mr Bouton more freedom. “We don't have suits telling us what to do,” he says.

To promote the brand on social media in its early days, Mr Woolverton came up with a novel idea. He hired local college students to send Halo Top coupons to people with large followings on YouTube and Instagram who were posting about health and fitness.

“That was a really big marketing strategy,” he explains. “We thought if they can buy it that's great; if they can't, we're on their radar anyway.”

Alex Beckett, global food and drink associate director at research group Mintel, says that Halo Top's continuing strong use of social media has been a key component behind its success.

“It enhanced its appeal as a cool, plucky alternative to global ice cream brands with larger advertising budgets,” Mr Beckett says.

And then there was the GQ article.

“That [Halo Top diet] is not something we recommend, to be clear, but it was a really fun article,” says Mr Woolverton. “It made the brand catch fire.”

After the story went viral, Halo Top enjoyed a rise in sales so meteoric that the business struggled to keep up with demand.

“[Supermarkets] didn't know how to deal with it either,” says Mr Woolverton. “For the first time people were buying three, four or five pints at a time. It had become the first lifestyle ice cream that people could eat daily.”

But should people really be eating Halo Top on a daily basis?

The ice cream contains two sweeteners – erythritol and stevia – in place of much of the sugar. While these are widely used across the food industry, and given a clean bill of health by food authorities, they do have their sceptics who say they may cause side-effects, such as exacerbating irritable bowel syndrome.

Other critics claim that Halo Top and its rival reduced-calorie ice creams could actually contribute to people putting on weight. And some question whether Halo Top should be allowed to call itself an ice cream, because it contains so little milk fat.

Mr Woolverton says the brand's success “is a recognition of how much smarter consumers are than a lot of companies think”.

Halo Top's success has also led to the launch of numerous other reduced-calorie ice cream brands. These include Unilever's Breyers Delight, Ben & Jerry's “Moo-phoria” range, and UK start-up Oppo.

Mr Woolverton has also been inundated with takeover proposals, including a reported $2bn offer from Unilever. He has rejected all of them, and instead has his eyes on global domination.

The company launched in the UK last year, and exports to countries including Australia and Singapore. Halo Top ice cream parlours, called Scoop Shops, have also opened in the US.

Mr Woolverton is confident that within five years Halo Top will be one of the biggest ice creams brands globally. “We'll be as well known as Ben & Jerry's,” he says.

By Anne Cassidy

 

 

Oprah Winfrey’s Legacy Celebrated at Smithsonian’s Museum Exhibit

 

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Dalai Lama’s Top 10 Rules For Success

 

He's a monk of the Gelug or “Yellow Hat” school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the schools of Tibetan Buddhism. The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso. The 14th Dalai Lama received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. He's Dalai Lama and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.

 

John Paul DeJoria : Overcoming Homelessness Twice to Become a Billionaire

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Inside Tommy Hilfiger’s Stunning $50 Million Penthouse in the Plaza Hotel

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New Orleans all-female motorcycle club empowering women everywhere

 

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Nelson Mandela’s Top 10 Rules For Success

 

He was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician, and philanthropist.

He served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999.

He is held in deep respect within South Africa, and he's often described as the “Father of the Nation”.

He's Nelson Mandela and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.

 

 

The senior letting older entrepreneurs know It’s never too late to reinvent yourself

 

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How Greg Cox sports injury led to a successful business career

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 17 Feb 2018) London, Uk – –

When a serious injury ended Greg Cox's hopes of making it as a professional rugby player, little did he know that it would set him on the path to making a fortune in business.

On the books of top English club Wasps back in 1999, the then 18-year-old was playing regularly for the second team, and had been called up by the England Under 19s squad.

Then one rainy evening training session Mr Cox says he twisted his knee ligaments “and that was that”.

“I had a full knee operation, and I did return to Wasps the next year,” he says. “But still recovering from the injury I couldn't apply myself as much when I came back. And you have to be 100% committed [to be successful at rugby].”

So realising that his contract was not going to be renewed he left the club, swapping rugby for working on building sites.

“I was earning £300 a week cash in hand, which when you are living at home isn't bad, but I was looking for something else to do, and thinking ‘how can I earn more money?'.”

Soon Mr Cox swapped being a bricklayer for the life of a serial entrepreneur, moving from importing cars, to property investments, and then into the world of finance.

Since 2009 he has been the founder and chief executive of Quint Group, which owns a number of financial technology or “fintech” businesses, and today has an annual turnover of £42m.

“I think I have always been entrepreneurial, I was always selling things to other pupils at school… and I've always had a real drive,” says Mr Cox, now 36.

Educated at a private school in the south west of England, he had gained good enough A-levels to go to university, but instead chose to try a career in rugby.

When things didn't work out at Wasps, he didn't think of making a late arrival at college. Instead while working on those building sites he came up with his first big moneymaking idea – importing cars.

“There was an article in the Sunday Times all about how to import a car from Europe and save money,” he says. “At the time there was a big hoo-ha in the press about cars in Europe being 20% cheaper than in the UK.

“So I thought that this was a really good idea for a business, so I created a company to help people import cars from Europe.”

Remembering how to program computers from his school days Mr Cox quickly built a website and started to import up to 400 cars a month, even handling work for much larger firms such as Virgin Cars.

“What many people didn't realise is that you could simply go to a car dealer in Germany or Belgium and they'd be quite happy to sell you a right hand drive car. It wasn't as if people would have to put up with a left hand drive vehicle.”

For the next two to three years business boomed for Mr Cox and his company Coszt Imports “despite the terrible name”.

But then a combination of the dotcom bubble bursting in 2001, and the pound going up in value meant that the business went bust.

“I felt dented pride and a bit stupid, I guess,” he says. “I had dived into it, and I didn't know how to run a business at that age.

“Obviously you think you are invincible at 21, but I learned a lot from it. I had racked up quite a bit of debt as a result of it all, so I just had to go straight back to work.”

So licking his wounds, Mr Cox moved to South Africa, and thanks to the weakness of that country's currency, he started to once again export cars to the UK. He then expanded into property investments.

By 2008 Mr Cox was back in the UK and investing in the fintech sector when together with a friend and business partner called Paul Naden they launched Quint Group in January of the following year.

Both investing £12,500, Mr Cox says that he saw a big opportunity to set up a number of consumer finance websites. Brands owned by Quint include Monevo, an online marketplace that connects lenders with consumers that wish to borrow money, and price comparison website Moneyguru.

Based in Macclesfield, in Cheshire in the north of England, Quint makes most of its money by charging lenders a commission, and it also has a data business called Infinian.

Mr Cox today owns 90% of Quint after buying out his co-founder last year. The company now has 100 employees, and overseas offices in Poland, China, South Africa, and the US, as it continues with its international expansion plans.

Richard Bell, north west editor of business news publisher Bdaily, says that “given the level of growth that Quint has achieved over the past couple of years… I'm keen to see where they are headed. Exciting business with switched-on leadership.”

Mr Cox is, however, happy to admit that it hasn't all been plain sailing at Quint, with an unsuccessful insurance business being closed down.

“When something doesn't work we stop it and do something else,” he says.

“My advice to anyone wanting to start a business is: Focus on what you are good at, work relentlessly at it, make considered decisions, don't be too emotive, and with a bit of luck you'll have some success.”

By Will Smale

 

 

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A food-inspired range of beauty products is tantalizing senses across the country. BathKandy's skincare range of products are hand-crafted using only natural, organic ingredients. And as an added bonus, they look and smell delicious.

 

 

Moorea Seal: A Female Entrepreneur’s Journey

 

 

In celebration of International Women’s Day,  sharing about inspiring everyday women

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Successful Shark Tank Businesses That Went on to Make Millions

 

Budding entrepreneurs get the chance to bring their dreams to fruition in this reality show from executive producer Mark Burnett. They present their ideas to the sharks in the tank — five titans of industry who made their own dreams a reality and turned their ideas into lucrative empires. The contestants try to convince any one of the sharks to invest money in their idea. When more than one of the sharks decide they want a piece of the action, a bidding war can erupt, driving up the price of the investment.

 

Jack Ma the richest man in Asia

 

Jack Ma wasn't born rich but now he is the richest man in Asia. This profile tells the story of how Ma started as a poor kid in China's countryside, learned English, got rejected from a job at KFC but then went on to found Alibaba, the massive e-commerce site.

 

 

How getting fired, turned Melissa Ben-Ishay passion for baking cupcakes into a successful business

 

Entrepreneur

When Melissa Ben-Ishay got fired, she immediately called her brother. He encouraged her to go home, bake her famous cupcakes and reassured her they would figure out how to turn her hobby into a business. Within a week, Baked by Melissa was up and running. Fourteen stores and a cookbook later, Melissa's bite-size treats are a huge success. She sat down with Jessica Abo to talk about her company's growth, the friends who helped her get here and what she's created to help you celebrate Valentine's Day.

 

 

 

Will Smith shares his success philosophy

 

He's the only actor to have eight consecutive films gross over $100 million in the domestic box office. He has been ranked as the most bankable star worldwide by Forbes. As of 2016, his films have grossed $7.5 billion at the global box office. For his performances in Ali, and in The Pursuit of Happyness, Smith received nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actor. He has won four Grammy Awards. He turned down the role of Neo in The Matrix in favor of Wild Wild West. In 2005, Smith was entered into the Guinness Book of World Records for attending three premieres in a 24-hour time span.