Jim Rohn – “True Happiness is not contained in what you get, happiness is contained in what you become”

Source: Habits of the wealthy


About Jim Rohn : Emanuel James Jim Rohn (September 17, 1930 – December 5, 2009) was an American entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker. Jim Rohn's rags to riches story played a large part in Jim Rohn's work, which influenced others in the personal development industry. Emanuel James Jim Rohn was born in Yakima, Washington, to Emanuel and Clara Rohn. Jim Rohn's owned and worked a farm in Caldwell, Idaho, where Jim Rohn grew up as an only child. Jim Rohn started Jim Rohn's professional life by working as a stock clerk for department store Sears. Around this time, a friend invited Jim Rohn's to a lecture given by entrepreneur John Earl Shoaff. In 1955, Jim Rohn joined Shoaff's direct selling business AbundaVita as a distributor. In 1957, Jim Rohn resigned Jim Rohn's distributorship with AbundaVita and joined Nutri-Bio, another direct selling company. It was at this point that the company's founders, including Shoaff, started to mentor Jim Rohn. After this mentorship, Jim Rohn built one of the largest organizations in the company. In 1960 when Nutri-Bio expanded into Canada, Shoaff and the other founders selected Jim Rohn as a vice president for the organization.

The billionaire who turned a small business in a shed into the biggest electronics operation on the planet

Source: Bloomberg

Foxconn is known for being the biggest assembler of iPhones. Terry Gou is the chairman and largest shareholder of Foxconn. He's also one of Taiwan's richest men. This is the story of how Gou turned a small operation in a shed into the biggest electronics operation on the planet. Now he's building a $14.5 billion factory in Wisconsin.

Controversial Billionaire Yusaku Maezawa to be Elon Musk’s First Moon Tourist

 

Source: Bloomberg

Retail tycoon Yusaku Maezawa has made billions by ignoring Japanese cultural norms and grabbing publicity through increasingly controversial stunts. Now, Elon Musk's SpaceX is sending him to the moon.

 

 

How Diamond Engagement Rings Became Part of Smart Advertising

 

Bloomberg

Most of us presume proposing with a diamond engagement ring is just part and parcel of getting married, but this tradition hasn't actually been around all that long. It was dreamt up by some smart advertising and has since changed the entire diamond market.

 

Uk voluntary living wage rises to £9 benefiting around 180,000 workers

(qlmbusinessnews.com via news.sky.com– Mon, 5th Nov 2018) London, Uk – –

One worker on the minimum wage tells Sky News that a proper living wage would liberate her from a “surviving pay cheque”

The voluntary living wage – designed to give workers enough money to live on – is to be increased.

The new rate has been calculated by the Living Wage Foundation to offset the rising cost of everything from public transport to monthly rent.

The new hourly rate will see the living wage rise by 25p to £9 for workers across the UK – except in London where it will rise by 35p to £10.55.

Both figures are higher than the statutory national living wage, which is due to rise to £8.21 in April for workers aged 25 and over.

More than 4,700 businesses have already signed up, benefiting around 180,000 workers.

Lauren Townsend – a graduate who works as a waitress for a multimillion pound restaurant chain on the minimum wage – would like to be one of them.

“A real living wage would make the difference between a surviving pay cheque and a pay cheque and living,” she told Sky News.

“I'm 27 years old and I live in a house share with four other adults who are all in their 20s,” she said.

“I live with a married couple. We can't afford to save to buy a house. We have no savings put aside for a rainy day. We are putting off having children because we can't afford to have children.”

Director of the Living Wage Foundation, Tess Lanning, wants more businesses to sign up.

“There has been a rise in the number of jobs paying less than the real living wage in the last year,” she said.

“So that's why we need more employers to step up, go beyond the government minimum and pay a real living wage based on what people need to live.”

She added that the living wage can have “real business benefits – improvements in staff turnover, absence rates, (and) a more motivated, loyal, engaged staff”.

David Lesniak, co-owner of bakery and restaurant Outsider Tart in Chiswick, pays his staff the living wage despite facing high running costs – particularly business rates.

He said: “It's exceedingly important that we do our best to do right by our staff because we know they are challenged in many ways, from how they get to work, how they put a roof over their head, and how they put food in their mouths, so wherever we can help out we try to help out.”

The business department said the statutory living wage had “helped to deliver the fastest wage growth for the lowest paid in 20 years”.

It added: “In last week's budget we announced that from April 2019 full-time workers will earn an extra £690 a year.

“The government takes advice on minimum wage rates from the independent Low Pay Commission (LPC), which balances the needs of workers and businesses.

“The LPC aims to set the national minimum wage as high as possible without harming employment prospects.”

By Emma Birchley

 

 

Danielle Ishak : The woman making robot companions for seniors

 

Bloomberg

For decades, we've dreamed of robots that can be our companions. Now, Danielle Ishak is trying to build one. Named ElliQ, this robot is aimed at the elderly who live alone, and it's in the homes of about a dozen beta testers in the Bay Area. Ishak's task is to study these seniors' interactions with ElliQ to make sure the robot is something they actually want

 

 

View a more eclectic side of London where locals enjoy spending time

 

Source: Youtube/Love and London

Forget London Bridge, Piccadilly Circus, Trafalgar Square… those areas are super-touristy, crowded, and don't show the character of London. In this video takes you to three areas in London where Londoners enjoy spending time, which shows you the side of the city that is full of character and diverse.

Ethnicity pay reporting by businesses ‘to create a fairer and more diverse workforce’

(qlmbusinessnews.com via news.sky.com– Thur, 11th Oct 2018) London, Uk – –

An audit last year showed significant differences in pay and promotion opportunities between white Britons and ethnic groups.

Businesses could be forced to reveal their ethnicity pay gap after an audit last year showed significant disparities in pay and promotion opportunities of different ethnic groups .

Announcing a consultation on mandatory pay reporting, Theresa May said: “Every employee deserves the opportunity to progress and fulfil their potential in their chosen field, regardless of which background they are from, but too often ethnic minority employees feel they're hitting a brick wall when it comes to career progression.”

The consultation will run until January to allow businesses to share views on what information should be published.

Mys May also unveiled a Race at Work Charter aimed at increasing recruitment and career progression of ethnic minority employees.

Among those to have already signed up are some of the UK's best known companies including accountancy firm KPMG and advertising company Saatchi & Saatchi as well as NHS England and the Civil Service.

Public sector bodies such as the the NHS, armed forces and police will also explain how they intend to increase ethnic minority staff in senior roles.

Mrs May said: “Our focus is now on making sure the UK's organisations, boardrooms and senior management teams are truly reflective of the workplaces they manage, and the measures we are taking today will help employers identify the actions needed to create a fairer and more diverse workforce.”

A year ago the Race Disparity Audit exposed the differences between ethnic groups in educational attainment, health, employment and treatment by police and courts.

At the time Mrs May promised to confront the “uncomfortable truths” it revealed. A key finding was that unemployment among black, Asian and minority ethnic people was nearly double that of white Britons.

Welcoming today's consultation Matthew Fell, chief UK policy director at the CBI, said: “Transparency can be a catalyst for action in tackling the ethnicity pay gap, in the same way that it has been so successful for gender.

“Reporting must be done in a way that is supported by both businesses and employees, to recognise the wide range of ethnic groups and legitimate staff concerns about intrusiveness where sample sizes are small.

“Companies want to work with the Government to achieve their goal of becoming more inclusive employers.”

 

 

15 Books Bill Gates Recommends Everyone Should Read

Alux.com

This video will try to answer the following questions:
what are some books bill gates recommends?
What Bill Gates favorite books?
Which books does bill gates recommend?
What are the best books to read?
Which are the best books for entrepreneurs?
What are some must read books?
What are bill gate's best books?

 

A Tour of The World’s Most Luxurious VIP Airport Terminal

Sam Chui

A tour of the world's most luxurious VIP Airport Terminal in Dubai South. Check out the amazing facility of JetEx and one of a kind duty free shopping such as BMW and Rolls Royce sports cars! This video gives you an insight how the rich and VIP travels.

 

Will Renting Rather Than Buying Our Clothes Be The Future

Pexels image

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 29th Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

The BBC's Circular Economy series highlights the ways we are designing systems to reduce the waste modern society generates, by reusing and repurposing products. This week we look at whether we will be renting our clothes instead of buying them in future.

Earlier this year a rather surprising marketing video went viral in China. The film, fronted by a social media influencer called Jiang Chacha takes viewers on a tour, not of a trendy night spot or fashionable clothes store but an industrial-scale laundry operation.

The company behind the ad, Beijing start-up YCloset, isn't selling laundry services, however. Instead it will rent you the latest in women's fashions.

Doris Ke, who created the campaign, says some Chinese consumers are still unsure about wearing clothes that have been worn before. The aim was to reassure them by showing the steam cleaners, the microscopes and the banks of washing machines they use to clean garments between loans.

 

At the end of the film Jiang Chacha is offered a glass of water that has been through the washing machine – implying it would be clean enough to drink.

YCloset, like other fashion rental companies springing up around the globe, believes once it's ironed out wrinkles such as anxieties over cleanliness, the idea of fashion rental is ready to go mainstream.

And while its motives may be about building the business, if the idea does catch on, it could also disrupt the current trend towards ever more disposable fashion and help reduce the environmental impact of one of the most resource intensive industries.

While it's always been possible to rent a tuxedo, a ball-gown or a fancy-dress costume, rental firms are now chasing the market for everyday wear. They argue the time is ripe for a Netflix or a Spotify of fashion, that could see us all renting clothes as a matter of course.

So Doris Ke's next campaign for YCloset showed a young business woman, who rented her wardrobe for work and eventually became so successful she outdid her boss and made it into Forbes magazine – to persuade Chinese women take more care over what they wear to work.

In this respect, YCloset is following the same path as firms like New York-based Rent the Runway, which pioneered the rental concept back in 2009, as well as its San Francisco rival Le Tote, and in the UK, Girl Meets Dress.

As well as offering one-off rentals, they now offer customers subscription packages that allow them to have several garments at a time for a flat monthly fee.

Rent the Runway's CEO and co-founder Jennifer Hyman has been explicit about her ambition to “put H&M and Zara out of business”.

Likewise, YCloset's chief operating officer Michael Wang has said it is “targeting the fast fashion daily wear market, where people can wear our products to work, during the weekend and also to a party”.

The firm says 10 million Chinese women have registered with it, even if they don't all yet use it. Rent the Runway says nine million are “members” though that doesn't mean they all use the service.

In the UK, Girl Meets Dress's founder, Anna Bance, says the same shift towards a more everyday role for rentals is happening at her firm, which started out predominantly lending designer dresses.

“Already it's not just for special occasions,” says Ms Bance. Some customers may want one dress a year “for their husband's work do in the city” but others are changing their habits and hiring a couple of dresses a week.

She says increasingly customers view it as a “frictionless” service alongside shopping for new clothes, but one that gives them access to higher quality and designer items. She thinks we could eventually be spending half of our clothes budgets on renting rather than buying.

 

That is already the case for 29-year-old New York-based Mila Petrova. As a business consultant she dresses smartly every day. But as she “hates shopping” and was already fed up with her high dry cleaning bill, she has switched to renting four outfits a week from Rent the Runway.

She wears them Monday to Thursday, then returns them and picks out new outfits online for the following week.

“I use it purely for making my life easier at work,” she says. But she notes that most of her friends, though they've happily embraced other parts of the sharing economy, haven't followed suit.

“Some people really like new stuff,” she says, “buying and owning clothes” while others see it as an unnecessary extra expense.

It's our love of buying new stuff, that has made fashion one of the most environmentally damaging industries, says the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, which launched a campaign earlier this year to encourage fashion firms to shift towards more “circular” patterns of resource use, reducing waste, and reusing resources more.

The trend amongst “generation Instagram” is to wear clothes on fewer occasions before they're thrown away or dumped in the back of a wardrobe, says Francois Souchet from the Foundation. They calculate that if you are able to double the number of times you wear a garment, you decrease its environmental footprint by 44%.

As rental firms make higher profits the more times they can rent out a garment; a shift to renting also implies a shift to products that are better made and longer wearing – another step towards a more sustainable fashion industry.

Moreover, firms like Le Tote, Girl Meets Dress, Rent the Runway and YCloset are applying the same kind of principles as their fast fashion rivals when it comes to using data analysis to track which styles are popular and which are most durable.

That in turn helps to avoid waste.

Mr Souchet says that while he doesn't see the rental model as a solution on its own to the challenges of fast fashion, he is hopeful that it will contribute to a change in the way we consume clothes.

That might rely in the long run on whether any big established players choose to back the model.

China's internet giant Alibaba, which has a track record of experimenting in the retail space, has already invested in both YCloset and Rent the Runway; while Amazon has been working hard at taking a large share of the US clothing retail market.

“It wouldn't be completely crazy” says Mr Souchet, to imagine both these online giants moving into rental fashion too, which would put a different perspective altogether on just how mainstream the idea could go.

By Lucy Hooker

 

Instagram co-founders step down from the photo sharing app

(qlmbusinessnews.com via telegraph.co.uk – – Tue, 25th Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

The co-founders of Instagram have stepped down from the photo sharing app, six years after it was acquired by Facebook for $1bn (£760m).

Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger informed Facebook's bosses of their resignation on Monday and plan to leave in the coming weeks, according to the New York Times.

The two have continued to run the app as chief executive and chief technology officer respectively as Instagram has ballooned from a hipster iPhone app to a giant with more than one billion users.

Their departure means that the founders of Facebook's three biggest acquisitions – WhatsApp, Oculus and now Instagram – have left since being bought by the social media giant. WhatsApp founder Jan Koum left Facebook earlier this year while Oculus Rift inventor Palmer Luckey departed last year amid a political row.

Reports of disagreements between Systrom and Krieger and Facebook's leadership have emerged in recent months. Mark Zuckerberg reportedly forced through the introduction of Instagram's Stories feature, a concept cloned from Snapchat, which has become wildly successful.

On Monday night Kevin Systrom posted a statement confirming the news:

“Mike and I are grateful for the last eight years at Instagram and six years with the Facebook team. We’ve grown from 13 people to over a thousand with offices around the world, all while building products used and loved by a community of over one billion. We’re now ready for our next chapter.

“We’re planning on taking some time off to explore our curiosity and creativity again. Building new things requires that we step back, understand what inspires us and match that with what the world needs; that’s what we plan to do.

“We remain excited for the future of Instagram and Facebook in the coming years as we transition from leaders to two users in a billion. We look forward to watching what these innovative and extraordinary companies do next.

Instagram has been one of Facebook's main bright spots as its owner has been beset by crises this year. The app had just 27m users when Facebook bought it in April 2012 but reached 1bn monthly users this summer. It has also offset a perceived exodus of younger users from the main Facebook social network.

News of their departure sparked speculation that Facebook had demanded a change to Instagram that Mr Systrom and Mr Krieger disagreed with.

Some reports have suggested the app is considering a “regram” button that would allow users to post other user's photos, similar to a Twitter retweet. The reports have been denied by Instagram.

A Facebook spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.

 

The Undercover Life Of A Female Bodyguard

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sun, 23rd Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

Jacquie Davis, who says she was the first woman to become a bodyguard in the UK, has protected royals and celebrities, rescued hostages and carried out undercover surveillance in her 30 years in the industry. Now her own life has inspired a Netflix thriller starring Noomi Rapace.

“When I came into the industry it was a very he-man attitude,” says Jacquie. “They just always wanted me to look after the female principal or the children which was ironic – as most of them were fathers and I wasn't even a mother!”

Having initially joined the police, Jacquie decided to move into private security in 1980 because it would give her more variety. “I wanted to do close protection, I wanted to do surveillance and wanted to do investigations,” she says.

Being a bodyguard is particularly high-profile at the moment thanks to Bodyguard, the BBC One drama starring Keeley Hawes as the UK's Home Secretary and Richard Madden as her personal protection officer. Writer Jed Mercurio's script is full of plot twists, guns – and a steamy relationship between the two lead characters.

“Technically it's been fine – it is a good drama,” says Jacquie, but while such relationships do occasionally happen “you'll get sacked immediately, no question”.

In her career she's travelled the world staying in five- and six-star hotels, but says “after 12 to 16 hours of thinking on your feet, it's not glamorous”. In addition to this, there is the toll on a bodyguard's private life. “You might not go home for eight to 10 weeks.”

Jacquie also specialises in the more dangerous end of the business – surveillance and rescue. Once she found herself begging on the streets of Iraq, disguised in a burka, as part of a mission to rescue oil workers.

While the job is about preventing danger to the client by planning ahead to avoid potential risks, sometimes real life can be as dramatic as any film or TV script.

 

 

“We were being chased by the Pakistan army and wandered into Kashmir,” she told BBC World Service's Business Daily programme. “The Kashmiri rebels were firing at the Pakistan army and we got caught in the crossfire.”

She and her team had gone undercover in a rescue mission to free a 23-year-old British woman who'd been tricked into going to Pakistan with her new husband.

Instead the woman was imprisoned, but eventually got a message to her mother telling her she was being held hostage and asking for help. Her mother contacted Jacquie.

One night, Jacquie broke into the villa where the woman was being held, handcuffed to an iron bedstead. “She said she was three months pregnant and was being raped, starved and beaten. I told her, ‘We will come back and get you out.'”

But suddenly they got a phone call telling them their cover was blown. “Benazir Bhutto, who I'd worked for [previously], had recognised me and thought she knew why I was there – to rescue somebody,” says Jacquie.

It meant they had to rethink their plans and act fast.

“We had to storm the villa by paying a taxi driver to ram the gates,” she says. They freed the woman and headed for India with the Pakistani army in pursuit. Going as far as they could in a vehicle they then walked across the mountains.

 

 

“We were trained and quite fit, but I've got a pregnant woman who's been beaten, starved and has a pair of flip-flops on. To me she was the real hero.”

Happily, they managed to dodge the gunfire in Kashmir and were able to bring the woman home.

Jacquie says there have been two big changes over her three decades in the industry.

More women are now signing up, though they still make up only one in 10 bodyguards in the UK.

The business also has a much higher public profile now. “Because of terrorism, security is in people's minds,” she says.

This political instability, coupled with an upsurge in the super-rich in the Middle East, China and elsewhere has driven the growth of the sector in recent years.

Figures from the Confederation of European Security Services show there are more than 230,000 people employed in the security services industry in the UK – and 1.9 million in the EU, with 44,000 security companies operating in the sector in Europe alone. Though only a fraction of these will actually be working as bodyguards.

 

 

In the UK, the Security Industry Authority (SIA) is the industry regulatory body responsible for personal licensing and private security regulations, and all newcomers need to do a training course first.

Which is fine as far as it goes, says Jacquie, but points out that “you're never going to come off a course and be a bodyguard or close protection operative immediately”.

Anybody working in personal protection needs to remember that they are not the client's friend. “You just have to maintain that slight apartness so you can be there when they need it and pull back when they don't,” she says.

Jacquie herself is now the subject of an upcoming Netflix film, Close. The action-thriller starring Noomi Rapace was inspired by Jacquie's life as a bodyguard and she was a consultant on the film.

Director Vicky Jewson has said that working with Jacquie “allowed us to bring an authenticity to the action scenes which was very important to me”.

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Despite the stereotype of burly security men in dark glasses, the essence of being a bodyguard is brains not brawn, Jacquie insists.

Recruits need to learn the softer skills of the business to work with clients. For instance, which knife and fork to use in a Michelin restaurant and how to have afternoon tea at the Ritz while blending into the background.

You also need to keep up with current affairs, she advises. “You have to be able to talk about the Nasdaq, not The Only Way Is Essex.”

She's not dismissive of the personal risks that are occasionally involved but says you can't worry going into a job.

“You do the job you're trained to do. When you come out, that's when you go, ‘Oh my God, what have I just done?'”

Listen to the whole interview with Jacquie Davis on Business Daily.

By Tim Bowler