Significant price overhaul of Apple’s new MacBook Pro in the UK post Brexit

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.businessinsider.com – – Fri, 28 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

 

Macbook
Gordon Mei/flickr.com

Apple's new laptops are extremely pretty — but they don't come cheap for Brits.

On Thursday, the Californian technology announced an overhaul of its MacBook Pro line, giving the devices a redesign and adding a touch-sensitive screen that sits above the keyboard.

But it also bumped up the prices for the laptops very significantly in the UK — far more than it did in its home market, the US — in what seems to be a response to the weakness of the pound following the Brexit vote.

Even existing Mac lines — ones that haven't been updated — have had their prices raised in the UK.

Some kind of price increase is often inevitable when doing a big product overhaul. And that's what you see in the States. The cheapest 13-inch MacBook Pro before the upgrade was $1,299; now, it's $1,499.

But in Britain, this price bump is far larger. The cheapest 13-inch MacBook Pro, pre-upgrade? £999. Now? £1,449.

That's an increase of £450 in the UK, compared to $200 in the US. (And remember: The dollar is worth less than the pound!)

This is even more pronounced on the more expensive 15-inch MacBook Pros. The cheapest model, pre-upgrade, was $1,999 in the US and £1,599 in the UK. Post-upgrade, it's $2,399 and £2,349.

That's a price increase of £750 in the UK, compared to an increase of $400 in the US.

An Apple spokesperson provided Business Insider with a boilerplate statement it has used in the past on the subject (emphasis ours):

“Apple suggests product prices internationally on the basis of several factors, including currency exchange rates, local import laws, business practices, taxes, and the cost of doing business. These factors vary from region to region and over time, such that international prices are not always comparable to US suggested retail prices.”

What's changed in Britain this year? Brexit! In June, Britain voted to leave the European Union — shaking markets and causing the pound to lose 18% of its value, dropping to 31-year lows.

Apple isn't trying to fleece British consumers here. As The Guardian's Alex Hern pointed out on Twitter, a “straight USD/GBP exchange, plus 20% for VAT, results in much the same prices.”

It's just that the previous relationship between US and UK prices is no longer applicable due to the falling value of the pound, and so Apple has updated it to correspond with the current USD-GBP exchange rate — protecting its margins, and sending British prices rocketing.

It's also worth noting that the online price listings aren't necessarily direct comparisons, as the US prices don't include sales tax, while the UK ones do include VAT (Value-Added Tax). But sales tax is generally lower than VAT, and in some states like Oregon it's as low as 0%.

We saw something similar happen in September, after the iPhone 7 was announced. Apple took the opportunity to quietly bump up the prices for certain models of iPhone and iPad in the UK — while not changing prices in the US.

And now Apple's doing it again. The MacBook Pro price hike at least comes alongside a redesign — but the company has also raised UK prices on a number of existing products. The 6-core Mac Pro now costs £3,899, £600 more than its previous price of £3,299, while its US price hasn't budged. The Mac Mini and iMac have also had UK price increases.

Rob Price

 

Uber drivers deserve workers’ rights UK tribunal rules

 

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com – – Fri, 28 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

 

Taxi Cab
By Ray Wewerka/flickr.com

Taxi app Uber should treat its drivers as employees and pay them the minimum wage and holiday pay, a British tribunal ruled on Friday, in a verdict that could hit thousands of firms and deliver a blow to the ‘gig economy'.

Two drivers brought their case to an employment tribunal in July, saying the rapidly expanding app, which allows users to book and pay for a taxi by smartphone, was acting unlawfully by treating them as self-employed and not providing certain rights.

Uber said it will appeal against what unions described as a “monumental” verdict.

The decision could also affect those who work for firms such as meal delivery services like Deliveroo, in the “gig economy” where individuals work for multiple employers day-to-day without having a fixed contract.

“This is a monumental victory that will have a hugely positive impact on drivers … and for thousands more in other industries where bogus self-employment is rife,” said Maria Ludkin, legal director at the GMB union which brought the case.

Uber is valued at $62.5 billion (48 billion pounds) and its investors include Goldman Sachs and GV, formerly known as Google Ventures.

It has faced protests, bans and legal action around the world including in the United States and much of Europe.

British judges ruled that Uber should pay the drivers the minimum wage, currently 7.20 pounds ($8.80) for over 21-year olds, and that working hours began the moment most drivers logged into the app.

“The Uber driver's working time starts as soon as he is within his territory, has the App switched on and is ready and willing to accept trips and ends as soon as one or more of those conditions ceases to apply,” they said in their verdict.

Lawyers representing the drivers said there will now be a further hearing to calculate the holiday and pay that they should receive and the firm may have to pay pension contributions.

Firms in Britain such as sports retailer Sports Direct have faced a backlash over their use of zero-hour contracts which erode pay and job security.

THREAT TO BUSINESS MODEL

The ruling could have implications for thousands of businesses across Britain and may influence judges in other countries where Uber faces legal battles, according to the head of legal and advisory at Peninsula, which advises companies on employment law.

“Judges in those other countries hearing test cases like this will be mindful of the fact that their colleagues in Britain have thought this and it may influence their decision,” Bertrand Stern-Gillet.

In the United States, Uber faces lawsuits and California state regulators ruled last year that an Uber driver should be treated as an employee rather than a contractor, although that has yet to be extended to all drivers in the state working on the platform.

A French court fined Uber 800,000 euros ($900,000) earlier this year for running an illegal taxi service with non-professional drivers and slapped smaller fines on two of its executives in the first such criminal case in Europe.

In Britain, the San Francisco-based firm had argued that its more than 40,000 drivers enjoy the flexibility of being able to work when they choose and receive on average much more than the minimum wage.

Uber's UK general manager Jo Bertram said it will contest the decision: “While the decision of this preliminary hearing only affects two people, we will be appealing it.”

Most employees in Britain are entitled to the minimum wage but the self-employed do not qualify.

One of the two drivers who brought the case, James Farrar, said that in August 2015 he earned less than the 6.70 pounds ($8.80) an hour for those aged 21 and older which was then the minimum wage at the time.

Uber said he had picked a month in which he had logged onto the app for the longest period of time but had canceled or not accepted the most amount of jobs.

While many welcomed the verdict, some drivers worry that Uber may not win its appeal.

“If the whole model changed, where Uber had to employ drivers and then take the risk on whether there was jobs for them, it wouldn't work and therefore I wouldn't have the flexible lifestyle that I have,” said 66-year-old Steven Rowe who has been with Uber for nearly four years.

“My biggest concern is that they would pull out of the U.K.,” he told Reuters.

By Costas Pitas

(Editing by Stephen Addison/Ruth Pitchford)m

 

Nissan to build more cars in the UK, tempering Brexit fears

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com – – Thur, 27 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

Britain's economy slowed only slightly in the three months after the Brexit vote and carmaker Nissan said it would build more cars in the country, tempering fears about the immediate economic impact of the decision to leave the European Union.

The stronger-than-expected growth figures published on Thursday further diminished the likelihood of the Bank of England cutting rates as soon as next week, prompting investors to sell British government bonds.

But finance minister Philip Hammond sounded cautious, saying he still planned to provide support for the economy as Britain launches tough negotiations with the EU next year.

“I think it is right that we still prepare to support the economy during the coming period to make sure that we get through this period of uncertainty,” said Hammond, who is due to announce his first budget plans next month.

Official data showed the economy grew by 0.5 percent between July and September, less rapid than the strong growth of 0.7 percent seen in the second quarter but comfortably above a median forecast of 0.3 percent in a Reuters poll of economists.

Sterling jumped to a one-week high against the U.S. dollar after the data and the yield on 10-year government bonds hit its highest level since the European Union membership referendum.

Marc Ostwald, a strategist at ADM Investor Services, said the GDP data killed the chance of a rate cut on Nov. 3 and could also prompt the Bank's most stimulus-sceptical policymaker Kristin Forbes to call for an end to its bond-buying.

Britain's dominant services industries provided all the growth, helped by a boom in the film and television sector as the latest releases in the Jason Bourne and Star Trek series hit the screens in July along with other blockbusters.

Compared with the third quarter of last year, growth picked up to 2.3 percent, the strongest pace in more than a year, according to the preliminary figures from the ONS.

“COME CLEAN”

Brexit supporters said the figures backed their argument that warnings of a big hit to the economy from a Leave vote were little more than scaremongering.

Economists for Brexit, a group who disagree with the majority view in their profession that leaving the EU is damaging, said Britain's finance ministry “must now come clean” and admit that its long-term forecasting was likely to be wrong, just as its short-term forecasts were.

But many economists are still warning that the real challenge is yet to come.

“The adverse consequences of the Brexit vote will become increasingly clear as inflation shoots up and firms postpone investment over the coming quarters,” said Samuel Tombs of Pantheon Macroeconomics, who correctly predicted the quarterly growth rate in the Reuters poll.

The sharp fall in the value of the pound since June is expected to push inflation to around 3 percent next year. BoE Governor Mark Carney this week noted the “fairly substantial” fall in sterling, in a sign that the Bank was no longer expecting to cut rates on Nov. 3.

Many companies are expected to put investment plans on hold pending the outcome of the two-year process of negotiating Britain's exit from the EU and a possibly longer period for securing the terms of its new relationship with the bloc.

But Japanese carmaker Nissan gave Prime Minister Theresa May a boost by saying it will build its new Qashqai model in Britain. A source said on Thursday the government had offered support to counter any damage from leaving the EU.

The new investment in manufacturing came as the ONS data showed how reliant Britain has become on its services sector, which grew by 0.8 percent from the April-June period.

By contrast, industrial production, including manufacturing, and construction both contracted, down 0.4 percent and 1.4 percent respectively. The fall in construction was the biggest since the third quarter of 2012.

By William Schomberg and Costas Pitas

(Additional reporting by David Milliken and Estelle Shirbon; editing by Andrew Roche)

Unseasonably warm weather boosts British autumn retail sales

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com – – Thur, 27 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

Oct 27 British retail sales rebounded in October to grow at their fastest rate in over a year, after an end to unseasonably warm weather boosted demand for autumn clothing, an industry survey showed on Thursday.

The Confederation of British Industry's retail sales balance

surged to +21 from September's reading of -8, far outstripping economists' forecasts of a pick-up to -2.

The expected sales balance for November also rose sharply to +21 from +7, a level last seen in December, and orders placed with suppliers were the strongest since March, though they are expected to dip in November.

September had brought warmer than usual weather, denting demand for new season clothes, but early October saw a return to more normal seasonal trends, the CBI said.

“With our Indian Summer now a distant memory, shoppers have been pounding the high street, with sales of clothing and other retailers outpacing expectations,” CBI chief economist Rain Newton-Smith said.

The figures follow official GDP data earlier on Thursday which showed the economy as a whole grew 0.5 percent in the three months to September, in contrast to forecasts for a steep slowdown after Britain voted to leave the European Union.

But the CBI warned that the slide in the pound since Britain voted to leave the EU was likely to push up prices next year, hurting sales.

“Household spending still has some momentum in the short-term, but we do expect the fall in the value of the pound to push up prices through the course of next year, hitting people's purchasing power,” Newton-Smith said.

ALSO IN BUSINESS NEWS

Official data last week showed British retail sales recorded their strongest quarter of growth since late 2014 in the three months to September, but warm weather and higher prices dented demand for new clothing towards the end of the period.

 By David Milliken

Lloyds set aside a further £1bn to meet compensation claims

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.finance.yahoo.com via new.sky.com – – Wed, 26 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

Lloyds Banking Group has set aside a further £1bn to meet compensation claims for the mis-selling of payment protection insurance (PPI).

The bank, which is 9% owned by the taxpayer, has already been forced to fork out more than £16bn over the issue – by far the biggest share of PPI policies.

Earlier this year, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) put a June 2019 deadline on all claims to draw a line under the scandal, which has already cost the banking industry around £30bn.

In its third quarter trading update, the banking group published underlying profit of just under £2bn, which is broadly flat compared to a year ago.

The total income for the quarter was £4.3bn, in line with the same period last year.

The group's statutory profit before tax dropped by 15% in the third quarter to £811m.

Lloyds said that it has accounted for a further provision of £150m to cover other conduct issues, which includes £100m in respect of packaged bank accounts.

“The outlook for the UK economy remains uncertain, however the strength of the recovery in recent years means the UK is well positioned,” the bank said in a statement.

Britain's largest retail bank also reported a £740m deficit in its pension fund, due to company pension schemes being hit by falling bond yields following the Brexit vote.

Over the summer, chief executive Antonio Horta-Osorio announced plans to cut an additional 3,000 jobs across Lloyds and close 200 branches by the end of next year, as part of an efficiency drive to improve dividends and profits against a more testing economic environment.

Shares in Lloyds have fallen by about a quarter since June's referendum and were down to 53.5p in early morning trading.

UK technology start-up Improbable seeks backing from both sides of the Atlantic

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.finance.yahoo.com via new.sky.com – – Wed, 26 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

A British technology company which last year attracted money from one of the hottest investors in Silicon Valley is in talks with prospective backers about a new funding round that could value it at more than £400m.

Sky News has learnt that Improbable, which creates virtual worlds used in complex computer games, has approached investors on both sides of the Atlantic (Shanghai: 600558.SS – news) about putting fresh money into the business.

The talks, which have yet to be concluded, come 18 months after Improbable took $20m from Andreessen Horowitz, the California-based tech investor which was an early backer of Facebook (NasdaqGS: FB – news) .

Improbable is widely regarded as one of the most exciting companies to be based in Tech City, the district of London which acts as a hub for digital start-ups.

The company, which says its software has a wide variety of potential applications, such as modelling how a virus might spread through a major city, was founded little more than three years ago by Herman Narula, a Cambridge computer science graduate.

Improbable has also described its Spatial operating system as being applicable in areas such as economics, finance, town planning, transport and military training.

Last year's fundraising was reported to have valued Improbable at $100m, with talks about a new round raised at five times that valuation raising eyebrows among some technology investors.

“It's a fantastic idea, but the revenue model isn't really proven yet,” said one serial backer of London start-ups.

Improbable is understood to have presented at a conference hosted by Allen & Co, the investment bank which focuses on technology and media deals, earlier this year.

Augmented and virtual reality companies are attracting significant investment from global technology investors, further inflating many of their valuations.

Allen & Co is now said to be assisting Improbable with its fundraising discussions. Improbable declined to comment.

Government gives greenlight to third runway at Heathrow

(qlmbusinessnews.com via new.sky.com – – Tue, 25 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

Virgin's founder is among business leaders wanting ‘shovels in the ground' as Heathrow nears full clearance for a third runway.

Sir Richard Branson has been among business leaders giving a warm welcome to the Government's support for a third runway at Heathrow.

The Virgin Group's founder told Sky News he wanted to congratulate the Government for taking the “tough” decision – arguing it would boost competition among airlines and create “hundreds of thousands of jobs”.

He added that the move would prove a rebalancing for the UK economy after the country voted to leave the EU – a prospect he opposed.

Analysis by the Airports Commission estimated that the airport's expansion will create up to 180,000 jobs and provide £211bn in economic benefits and growth across the UK by 2050.

The director general of the British Chambers of Commerce, Adam Marshall. said the businesses will now want assurances from Westminster that construction can begin as soon as possible.

“Put simply, it's about time,” he said of the decision.

“This new runway must be viewed as much about connecting the regions and nations to the world as it is about capacity for London and the South East,” he added.

Heathrow Airport expansion: Now comes the hard part

Mike Cherry, national chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), welcomed the decision as “a welcome boost for British business.”

“We now need to see budgets committed and shovels in the ground as soon as possible,” he added.

Heathrow Airport expansion: Now comes the hard part

Mike Cherry, national chairman of the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), welcomed the decision as “a welcome boost for British business.”

“We now need to see budgets committed and shovels in the ground as soon as possible,” he added.

The general secretary of the TUC, Frances O'Grady, has echoed this sentiment, calling on the Government to “ensure Heathrow expansion is put in the fast lane”.

Mick Rix, national officer for transport and distribution at GMB, the union that represents airport workers, said the decision is a “win, win for everyone”.

He added that the union has supported a third runway at the airport for the best part of a decade and that expansion has a “clear-cut case”.

But no frills carrier Ryanair, which has long campaigned for more competition and choice between runways, criticised the decision to approve just a third runway at Heathrow.

“Approving a third runway at Heathrow over Gatwick is not the way forward,” said Ryanair's CEO Michael O'Leary.

“London now benefits from three competing airports and the best way to deliver additional runways in a timely and cost efficient manner is to approve three additional runways, one each at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted.”

International Airlines Group (IAG) CEO Willie Walsh warned: “We're pleased that a decision has finally been made but the cost of this project will make or break it.

“The Government's directive to cap customer charges at today's level is fundamental.

“Heathrow is the world's most expensive hub airport so it's critical that new capacity is affordable. The airport has consistently argued that the British economy will benefit if the third runway is approved.

“Heathrow want it, argued for it and now must ensure it's the UK and the travelling public who get the benefits from the runway, not the airport's owners.”

Steel Pension Scheme deficit falls to around 50 million pounds

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com – – Mon, 24 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

British Steel pension shortfall shrinks to around $60 million

The British Steel Pension Scheme's deficit has shrunk to around 50 million pounds ($61 million) from around 700 million pounds earlier this year, it said on Monday, adding it had been well-position to take advantage of currency movements.

The pension scheme is seen as a major obstacle to a possible joint venture deal between Tata Steel, its principal sponsoring employer, and Germany's Thyssenkrupp to manage Tata's remaining UK operations.

In an emailed statement, the British Steel Pension Scheme said an actuary estimated at a board meeting on Oct. 21 that the deficit had fallen to around 50 million pounds.

It had been “well positioned for what has been happening in bond and currency markets in recent months” and had taken the opportunity to lock in gains from equity investments.

Tata Steel, which inherited the pension scheme when it bought Corus, formerly British Steel, for $12 billion in 2007, declined to comment on the revision.

Analysts said the reduced deficit did not address all the problems and that volatility could remain even though the scheme had removed some risk.

“It demonstrates that market conditions have changed and could just as easily have deteriorated,” Martin Hunter of pensions consultants Punter Southall said.

If an employer was not able to support the scheme in future, the deficit would be higher, he added.

The government said in May that the scheme – which has roughly 125,000 members and only about 10,000 people still paying into it — had assets of 13.3 billion pounds and liabilities of around 14 billion pounds.

But sterling has shed nearly 18 percent against the dollar since Britain's June 23 vote to leave the European Union, boosting many of the blue-chip FTSE 100's international companies, which earn much of their revenues in dollars and therefore get a currency-related accounting lift.

ALSO IN BUSINESS NEWS
Since the start of the year, the FTSE 100 is up around 13 percent, although down around 7 percent in U.S. dollar terms.

The volatility and uncertainty generated by Brexit have added to the difficulties facing many pension schemes, which have been struggling to find returns in an ultra-low interest rate environment.

By Barbara Lewis

(Additional reporting by Simon Jessop; Editing by Alexander Smith)

£10 million venture capital fund to invest in female entrepreneurs in the UK.

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.businessinsider.com – – Mon, 24 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

Debbie Wosskow, the CEO of home sharing platform Love Home Swap, and Anna Jones, the former CEO of publisher Hearst Magazines UK, are raising a £10 million venture capital fund to invest in female entrepreneurs in the UK.

The duo announced their new AllBright fund on Monday, saying it will help to address the funding gap that currently exists between male and female led companies.

Wosskow told Business Insider that a number of high net worth individuals and angels have already contributed towards the £10 million fund but was unable to provide an exact figure. The company hopes to make up the remainder from other limited partners (LPs) between now and the end of the year.

In April, analysts at tech research firm CrunchBase found that just 10% of the world's VC money currently goes to female founders.

In addition to the VC fund, AllBright is launching a crowdfunding platform in the next two weeks so members of the public can back female-founded companies, with investments of £100 and upwards. There will also be an “AllBright Academy” at some stage, which will provide female founders with online courses and mentoring sessions.

“The VC fund alone doesn't cut it because you can't get the scale, no matter how big the fund is,” said Wosskow, who is chairman of AllBright. “But the fund, plus the crowd, and the academy will do it.”

Wosskow, an angel investor herself that has backed the likes of Kate Unsworth's smart jewellery firm Vinaya, was keen to stress AllBright is for companies of all shapes and sizes, not just those in tech.

“This isn’t about tech,” she said. “The statistics on women-led business are just so crap. We felt like we needed to do something to change the conversation.”

Wosskow, who was tasked by the UK government with writing a report on the sharing economy in the UK, was also keen to highlight that AllBright isn't “anti-men,” pointing to several male employees on the AllBright team.

By Sam Shead

AT&T agreed to buy Time Warner for $85 billion

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com – – Sun, 23 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

AT&T Inc said on Saturday it agreed to buy Time Warner Inc for $85.4 billion (70 billion pounds), the boldest move yet by a telecommunications company to acquire content to stream over its high-speed network to attract a growing number of online viewers.

The biggest deal in the world this year will, if approved by regulators, give AT&T control of cable TV channels HBO and CNN, film studio Warner Bros and other coveted media assets. The tie-up will likely face intense scrutiny by U.S. antitrust enforcers worried that AT&T might try to limit distribution of Time Warner material.

AT&T will pay $107.50 per Time Warner share, half in cash and half in stock, worth $85.4 billion overall, according to a company statement. AT&T said it expected to close the deal by the end of 2017.

Dallas-based AT&T said the U.S. Department of Justice would review the deal and that it and Time Warner were determining which Federal Communications Commission licenses, if any, would be transferred to AT&T in the deal.

U.S. lawmakers were already worried about cable company Comcast Corp's $30 billion acquisition of NBCUniversal, creating an industry behemoth. Several argued for close regulatory scrutiny of the AT&T deal.

“Such a massive consolidation in this industry requires rigorous evaluation and serious scrutiny,” said U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal, former attorney general of Connecticut. “I will be looking closely at what this merger means for consumers and their pocketbooks.”

U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump said at a rally on Saturday he would block any AT&T-Time Warner deal if he wins the Nov. 8 election. Trump has complained about media coverage of his campaign, especially by Time Warner's CNN.

“It's too much concentration of power in the hands of too few,” said Trump.

Representatives of his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

CONTENT PLUS DELIVERY

AT&T, whose main wireless phone and broadband service business is showing signs of slowing, has already made moves to turn itself into a media powerhouse. It bought satellite TV provider DirecTV last year for $48.5 billion.

It had about 142 million North American wireless subscribers as of June 30, and about 38 million video subscribers through DirecTV and its U-verse service.

New York-based Time Warner is a major force in movies, TV and video games. Its assets include the HBO, CNN, TBS and TNT networks as well as the Warner Bros film studio, producer of the “Batman” and “Harry Potter” film franchises. The company also owns a 10 percent stake in video streaming site Hulu. The HBO network alone has more than 130 million subscribers.

The deal is the latest in the consolidation of the telecom and media sectors, coming on the heels of AT&T's purchase of NBCUniversal. AT&T's wireless rival Verizon Communications Inc is in the process of buying internet company Yahoo Inc for about $4.8 billion.

Time Warner Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bewkes rejected an $80 billion offer from Twenty-First Century Fox Inc in 2014.

FINANCING

AT&T said the cash portion of the purchase price would be financed with new debt and cash on its balance sheet. AT&T said it has an 18-month commitment for an unsecured bridge term facility for $40 billion.

AT&T currently has only $7.2 billion in cash on hand. Further borrowing could put pressure on its credit rating as it already had $120 billion in net debt as of June 30, according to Moody's.

AT&T said the deal would add to earnings per share in the first year after closing. It said it expects $1 billion in annual run-rate cost savings within three years of closing, chiefly driven by lower corporate and procurement spending.

5G IS COMING

Owning more content gives cable and telecom companies bargaining leverage with other content companies as customers demand smaller, hand-picked cable offerings or switch to watching online. New mobile technology including next-generation 5G networks could make a content tie-up especially attractive for wireless providers.

“We think 5G mobile is coming, we think 5G mobile is an epic game-changer,” Rich Tullo, director of research at Albert Fried & Co, said in a research note, adding that mobile providers would be in position to disrupt traditional pay-TV services.

A previous Time Warner blockbuster deal, its 2000 merger with AOL, is now considered one of the most ill-advised corporate marriages on record.

Perella Weinberg Partners LP, Bank of America Corp and JPMorgan Chase & Co were financial advisers to AT&T, with Bank of America and JPMorgan also offering bridge financing, while Sullivan & Cromwell LLP and Arnold & Porter LLP provided legal advice.

Allen & Co LLC, Citigroup Inc and Morgan Stanley acted as financial advisers to Time Warner, while Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP was its legal adviser.

By Greg Roumeliotis and Jessica Toonkel | NEW YORK

(Additional reporting by David Shepardson, Liana Baker, Malathi Nayak and Diane Bartz; Writing by Bill Rigby; Editing by David Gregorio)

 

Uk banks prepare to leave in early 2017 over Brexit fears – Observer

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com via observer – – Sun, 23 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

British banks
www.flickr.com/photos,:
London's financial district by Michael Duxbury

Britain's biggest banks are preparing to move out of the country in early 2017 because of fears over the impending Brexit negotiations, while smaller banks are making plans to leave before Christmas, the chief executive of the British Bankers' Association Anthony Browne said.

“The public and political debate at the moment is taking us in the wrong direction,” the Observer Sunday newspaper quoted Browne as saying in an interview.

The paper released a short extract on Saturday evening but no further comments by Browne from the interview were immediately available.

Banks in Britain depend on a European “passport” to serve clients across the 28-country European Union from one base and lenders worry that this right will end after Britain leaves the EU.

Banks have already said they are making contingency plans to move some of their operations to continental Europe if Britain does not negotiate access to the EU single market after Brexit.

Prime Minister Theresa May has said she will trigger formal talks to leave the EU by the end of March 2017 after Britain voted to leave in a referendum last June.

She has said she will fight to retain access to the single market but several EU leaders have insisted that will depend on Britain accepting free movement of workers from the EU – a condition Britain has vowed to curtail.

(Reporting by Stephen Addison; editing by Andrew Roche and Grant McCool)

Setback for Chancellor Philip Hammond, as UK public finances worsen

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com – – Fri, 21st Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

UK public finances
London Skyline/Megan Trace/flickr.com

Britain's public finances showed a much bigger than expected deficit in September, a setback for Chancellor Philip Hammond as he prepares to deliver the country's first budget plans since the Brexit vote.

Investors are already nervous about the prospect of an acrimonious British departure from the European Union, and Friday's figures may limit Hammond's ability to cushion the blow of the referendum result via higher spending or tax cuts.

Britain ran a budget shortfall of 10.6 billion pounds last month, 14.5 percent higher than the deficit in the same month last year, the Office for National Statistics said.

The deficit, excluding state-owned banks, was above all forecasts in a Reuters poll of economists, which had produced a median projection of an 8.5 billion-pound shortfall.

Despite falling from more than 10 percent of economic output in 2010 to 4 percent in the last financial year, Britain's deficit remains among the highest for any developed nation.

Hammond, responding to Friday's figures, reiterated his message that he will bring down the budget deficit more slowly than his predecessor George Osborne had planned.

“We remain committed to fiscal discipline and will return the budget to balance over a sensible period of time, in a way that allows us the space to support the economy as needed,” he said in a statement.

But the slow improvement of the public finances in the year to date, combined with an expected slowdown in the economy next year that will hurt tax revenues, represents a constraint for Hammond as he prepares his Nov. 23 Autumn Statement.

He has said any extra spending on infrastructure projects was likely to be modest, disappointing some economists who said he could be bolder with government borrowing costs so low.

NO SPLURGE

The weak September figures took the deficit in the first half of the financial year to 45.5 billion pounds, down nearly 5 percent from the same period in the previous year but already close to the 55.5 billion pounds forecast for the 2016/17 tax year as a whole by Britain's budget watchdog in March.

The Office for Budget Responsibility said it was clear that its March forecast was “very unlikely to be met” but said the size of the miss was likely to be reduced by one-off factors that weighed on borrowing in the first half of the year and an expected jump in income tax receipts later in the year.

The OBR said it was still too early to assess the impact of the Brexit vote on Britain's public finances.

ALSO IN BUSINESS NEWS

Samuel Tombs, an economist with Pantheon Macroeconomics, said Hammond would probably want to keep some room for a loosening of the purse strings once Britain actually leaves the EU which will probably be shortly before the next election.

“As a result, we think that the chancellor will scrap the 0.8 percent of GDP fiscal tightening planned for 2017, but will not set fiscal policy to boost growth and will ensure that the fiscal consolidation resumes thereafter,” Tombs said.

September's weak performance was partly caused by a fall in receipts from corporation tax and property transactions. Growth in value-added tax receipts was slower than earlier in the year.

It was the first fall in corporation tax revenues for the month of September since 2009, the ONS said, adding that it was unable to provide a reason for the fall.

The growth in VAT receipts was the slowest for the month of September since 2012.

By William Schomberg

London frets over future,Thirty years on from Big Bang

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com – – Fri, 21st Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

LONDON (IFR) – Bang! It was the explosion in financial markets heard across the world 30 years ago which transformed the City of London from a cosy network of long-established firms into a cut-throat landscape dominated by foreign banks.

This week is the 30th anniversary of Big Bang, a package of reforms across the securities industry that shaped the City that exists today, putting London alongside New York as the world's two dominant financial centres.

This year's anniversary has extra significance. International firms that arrived on the back of Big Bang are considering whether to stick with London or move operations and jobs elsewhere following Britain's vote in June to leave the European Union.

“It [Big Bang] put London on the map in a way it wasn't before. All the international firms came to London or enlarged what they had,” recalled Nicholas Goodison, who was the architect of the reforms as chairman of the London Stock Exchange at the time.

OVERNIGHT JOLT

Although the full impact of Big Bang evolved over years and the reasons for the reforms went back more than a decade, the transformation is associated with an overnight jolt – on October 27 1986.

That was the brainchild of Goodison. He said a number of the necessary changes were inter-related so should all come at the same time, with good warning, to ensure orderly change.

“We could have done it piecemeal but they were all too closely linked to each other,” Goodison, now 82, told IFR in an interview last week.

There were several parts to Big Bang: it abolished minimum fixed commissions on trades; it removed “single capacity”, which since 1911 had separated the role of brokers, who acted as agents for clients, and jobbers, who made the market and provided liquidity by holding stock on their books; and it allowed foreign ownership of UK brokers, to fix capital shortfalls at many firms.

Big Bang also introduced electronic share trading, which did away with the need for face-to-face share deals and made trading far quicker and more efficient.

The changes were brought in to head off an investigation by the competition watchdog, which wanted to take the stock exchange to the Restrictive Practices Court, a move Goodison said would have resulted in chaos.

In 1983 he proposed to Cecil Parkinson, trade and industry secretary at the time, that he would eliminate fixed commissions within three years.

Parkinson agreed and, helped by Chancellor of the Exchequer Nigel Lawson, persuaded Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to back the reforms. That was not easy because Thatcher “didn't like being friends with the City”, Goodison recalled. He said she subsequently took little interest in Big Bang, despite being credited as its driving force.

“The myth that Big Bang was part of Mrs Thatcher's revolution is just wrong,” Goodison said.

Goodison said the reforms were inevitable after the US abolished fixed commissions in 1974 and Britain scrapped exchange controls in 1979.

“The writing was on the wall and we knew that,” he said.

“Anybody could forecast that the competitive pressures on fixed commission would increase because the biggest securities houses in the world were in America. It was obvious the thing was creaking.”

Goodison said Big Bang achieved its goal better than a court ruling would have done because it pushed through changes smoothly.

The biggest challenge was setting up the electronic trading platform. “It broke down in the first hour. It was difficult. But the reason it broke down was that it had a huge volume of people trying to access it on the first morning and everybody pressed buttons at once.”

It was sheer curiosity that caused it to break down, he said.

FOREIGN PREDATORS

Big Bang sparked profound changes across the City.

Brokers, jobbers and merchant banks started merging. Some were bought by UK clearing banks, but many more were snapped up by big US, European and Asian banks.

Well-known firms such as James Capel, Schroders and Warburg kept some branding in bigger firms, but other old names such as Pinchin Denny and Scrimgeour Kemp Gee were easily swallowed.

That has led to criticism of the “Wimbledonisation” of the City – that London hosts the activity but most of the top players are foreign. Barclays and HSBC are two of the top 10 investment banks today, but the dominance of the City by overseas firms, especially from the US, is a legacy of Big Bang.

“Under the previous system it was pretty much a closed shop, and suddenly they [foreign firms] were allowed to come in,” said Paul Mumford, a fund manager at Cavendish Asset Management.

“A lot of banks seized the opportunity and London became a global centre for markets. It could never have happened if we hadn't had this change,” Mumford told IFR.

Just as London firms were swallowed or reinvented, many careers changed, including Mumford's. He had been a broker and analyst, but a year after Big Bang he moved into fund management.

“It was a relatively painless process but it took a little while for it to have its repercussions on certain areas,” Mumford said.

There were other less direct but still significant effects of Big Bang, including making it easier for firms to raise capital, contributing to the growth of hedge funds, and helping the rise of Canary Wharf as a new financial district in East London as firms could trade further away from the City using electronic communications.

Culture also changed. Hours became longer, lunches shorter and pay rose. The business became more aggressive and less clubby, according to people who worked in the City on both sides of the changes.

Critics reckon many of the banking industry's misconduct problems of the past decade can be traced to Big Bang, as it gave rise to a bonus culture that undermined the City's long-standing code of conduct and integrity.

Goodison, for his part, was not paid for his work for the stock exchange. He was its last unpaid chairman, from 1976 to 1988, and held the role alongside his position as senior partner at Quilter Goodison, a broker that went the way of many peers – it was bought by an overseas predator, France's Paribas.

Goodison said London was right to welcome international firms and needs to continue to do so to stay in front, aided by the advantages of its time zone, language and legal system.

“If London wants to win it has to be open. You can't run a closed shop and win. The essence of London's financial markets is openness to the world,” he said.

By Steve Slater

Lender Microfinance Ireland tackle low awareness to its loans

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.finance.yahoo.com via TheJournal.ie – – Thur, 20 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

Microfinance ireland (mfi) has rebranded its loan packages for small businesses to make its overall offering clearer to customers.
The government-backed lender, which specialises in loans to firms with fewer than 10 employees, has segmented its loan packages into four categories:

Set-up loans for startups, €5,000-€25,000
Cashflow support for existing businesses, €5,000-€25,000
Business development loans for existing businesses, €5,000-€25,000
Small loans for businesses with low funding requirements, €2,000-€25,000

Until now, the organisation has marketed a blanket offer of loans from €2,000 to €25,000 without explaining what exact options were available.
Chief executive Garrett Stokes said that the MFI largely relied on local enterprise offices to explain and tease out the different loan packages available.

He told Fora that he expects the rebranding exercise will “make our overall offering more user-friendly”.

“What we’ve tried to do with the packaging is be very precise so it becomes much clearer to (customers) as to what we’re offering, the terms of the offer and so that when they come online to us through their local enterprise office, they know exactly what they’re looking for.”
Awareness

In the most recent ‘bank watch survey’ by ISME, which represents small- and medium-sized businesses in Ireland, awareness of the government’s microfinance scheme was down with just over half of respondents saying they knew what it was.

Stokes said the clearer loan packages will boost awareness of the programme, which he described as a “huge advantage” to early-stage businesses.

“The majority of our customers are people who cannot, for whatever reason, get lending from traditional lenders,” he said. “(MFI) enables somebody who has a good idea and wants to set up a businesses but can’t get the money themselves or funding from a bank to have another location to get help.”

He said that MFI’s criteria is “quite different from a bank” because all of its loans are unsecured.

By Conor McMahon

HSBC : Virtual reality worlds the future of holidays

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.businessinsider.com – – Thur, 20 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

The future of transport and tourism may well involve not going anywhere.
Researchers at HSBC have seen the future and it features a lot of virtual reality.

People will be able to use the technology to visit virtual worlds as real as our own, HSBC analysts Davey Jose and Anton Tonev said in a note to clients.

And, while they'll be free to visit, they might be full of ads.
VR could “create a many new avenues for recreation and leisure, and if it follows the ad models of many of the technology giants today, these VR recreation activities could be free,” HSBC said.

“If this is the case, instead of recreation costs going up, costs could decline, even if the number of hours spent in virtual worlds for leisure increases.”

Tech giants such as Google, Facebook, and Sony are pushing virtual reality headsets as the next big thing. In a demo last week Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg showed off “Social VR,” using a combination of the Oculus Rift headset and a 360-degree camera to mash together virtual reality and the real world.

The technology has endless applications and the workplace of the future may well only exist in virtual reality, eliminating the need to commute to the office, the HSBC analysts said.

Meanwhile, physical transport will become totally autonomous. With less traffic and more AI-driven vehicles, the era of car collisions and deaths on the road will end sometime around 2040, according to the HSBC report.
Key to this change is the development of “haptics” – technology that engages all the senses in the virtual world, rather than just sight and sound, to make it feel more real.

“With technology rapidly advancing and R&D efforts going into the development of better ‘haptics’, where one will be able to ‘feel’ in the virtual world, we believe that it’s likely that the next generation of ‘VR natives’ may find it preferable to utilise VR to travel virtually rather than physically,” HSBC said.

The investment bank added that this might not be such a big leap as we might think. “The shift from the physical to a digital format, in general, is not a novel concept, it has happened before,” HSBC said, pointing to the communication switch from physical letters to virtual e-mails.
“For example, physical mail in US and China declined from the early 2000s to 2014/15 by about 40%. However, in this time, average emails sent increased fifteen-fold, from 12bn to over 200bn per day,” HSBC said.

Travelling to virtual rather than real places is quicker, cheaper and safer than conventional physical transport, HSBC said.
The rise of the technology could cut commute times and make it more attractive to live out in the countryside rather than the city.
This would solve the problem of rising commuting times and growing work days, freeing up precious time to spend in virtual reality holiday worlds.

While it remains to be seen whether the experience of virtual reality will top the excitement of travelling to new places, it certainly would be more convenient.

By Ben Moshinsky

Dozens of branches of Travis Perkins to close with the loss of 600 jobs

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.finance.yahoo.com,via Skynews.com – – Wed, 19 Oct, 2016) – –

Travis Perkins is cutting 600 jobs and closing more than 30 branches as it warns of “uncertain” trading in the year ahead.
The builders' merchant, which owns the Wickes brand, said those at risk of being affected had already been informed.

The job losses come across its trade brands such as Travis Perkins, Benchmarx, and plumbing and heating businesses BSS and PTS.
Travis Perkins is cutting 600 jobs and closing more than 30 branches as it warns of “uncertain” trading in the year ahead.

The builders' merchant, which owns the Wickes brand, said those at risk of being affected had already been informed.

The job losses come across its trade brands such as Travis Perkins, Benchmarx, and plumbing and heating businesses BSS and PTS.

The company said it hoped to relocate some of the staff.
Wickes – and its other consumer-facing business Toolstation – are not affected.

Ten smaller distribution centres will also close under the plans.
The company's chief executive, John Carter, said: “It is still too early to predict customer demand in 2017 with certainty and we will continue to monitor our lead indicators closely.

“Given this uncertainty we will be closing over 30 branches and making further efficiency-driven changes in the supply chain, resulting in an exceptional charge of £40-50m this year.”

While it did not mention the UK's vote to leave the EU specifically and the resulting collapse in the value of the pound, the FTSE 100 firm made it clear it was seeking to cut costs to account for any drop-off in business.
The company said that while it was currently outperforming the market, its full-year profits would likely fall slightly shy of estimates.
The warning prompted a 7% fall in its share price.

It reported total sales growth of more than 3% for its third financial quarter – with growth across the board except in its PTS heating and BSS plumbing businesses, describing trading as “not satisfactory”.
Travis Perkins has taken on 4,000 staff this year amid an expansion of its best-performing outlets – with over 50 Wickes stores given an overhaul.

Uk hit by £10 billion annual cybercrime

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.businessinsider.com – – Wed, 19 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

The UK economy lost up to £10.9 billion as a result of online fraud and cybersecurity last year, according to new research — that's around £210 for every person over the age of 16 in the country.

The figures, from the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau and crime awareness group Get Safe Online (GSO), would likely be even higher if more cybercrime was reported. 39% of those who had been victims of cybercrime in a GSO survey said that they hadn't reported the incident.
The report also highlights a worrying gap in people's understanding of what constitutes an online crime.

86% said that they had not been targeted by cyber criminals in the past 12 months. 68% of respondents, however, said they had been targeted in a variety of ways — deceptive emails, fraudulent websites, and email account hacking, all of which are common methods for online theft.
Another worrying trend is the rise of ransomware, a type of malicious software designed to block access to a computer system until a sum of money is paid. 3% of victims in the survey had been victims of ransomware.

The research also highlighted a widespread belief that cybercrime is inevitable — 37% of those surveyed who have been a victim of cybercrime said that they felt there was “nothing that could be done” to prevent it.
Tony Neate, chief executive of GSO, said in an emailed statement: “The fact that over a third of people felt there was nothing that could have been done to stop them becoming a victim is alarming indeed – particularly when it’s so easy to protect yourself online.”

City of London Police’s commander Chris Greany said: “The huge financial loss to cybercrime hides the often harrowing human stories that destroy lives and blights every community in the UK.

“All of us need to ask ourselves are we doing everything we can to protect ourselves from online criminals. Unfortunately, people still click on links in unsolicited emails and fail to update their security software. Just as you wouldn’t leave your door unlocked, so you shouldn’t leave yourself unprotected online,” he added.

By Thomas Colson

Tenants to face rent increase as 440,000 landlords are hit by changes in tax

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.finance.yahoo.com – – Tue, 18 Oct, 2016) London, Uk – –

Thousands of tenants could face substantial rent rises next spring or even be forced to move out as sweeping tax changes hitting their landlords come into effect.

About 440,000 landlords are facing substantially higher tax bills which could see them passing on the costs to their tenants or selling up, a pressure group has warned.

The changes will mean landlords will no longer be able to deduct mortgage interest payments or any other finance-related costs from their turnover before declaring their taxable income.

The National Landlord Association says more than 400,000 landlords who currently pay basic-rate tax will immediately be hit by the changes although, potentially, the majority of Britain’s estimated 2m landlords could find their tax liability rise.

It says about a third of landlords in London and the east of England will be affected next April, with just over a quarter in the West Midlands.
Richard Lambert, chief executive officer of the NLA, said its research showed government claims the changes would only affect a small number of higher-rate taxpayers were “complete tosh”.

“The government must look to amend these tax changes and minimise the impact on landlords and their tenants – something that could easily be achieved by applying the rules to only new loans written after April 2017.
“Unless this happens, landlords will face an impossible decision of whether to increase rents and cause misery for their tenants, or to sell-up, and force their tenants to find a new home,” he added.

Warning shot: landlords face being squeezed by the taxman come next spring

The amount by which landlords will be affected will depend on their personal circumstances, including whether or not they generate income from any other sources.
Landlords’ tax liability will increase depending on their existing annual mortgage interest payments, which are broken down by portfolio size:
Single property – £3,600
2-3 properties – £8,600
4-5 properties- £16,300
5-10 properties – £18,200
11-19 properties – £24,900
20+ properties – £38,000
It has been estimated that some 7.2 million UK households will be in rented accommodation within a decade as house price inflation continues to see increasing numbers struggle to get on the property ladder.

By Mark Dorman

 

House calls are on the way back thanks to this health care startup

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.finance.yahoo.com – – Tue, 18 Oct, 2016) London, Uk – –

One health care company is harnessing technology to bring a doctor to your doorstep within two hours.

Heal connects patients with vetted and licensed pediatricians and family practice doctors. Doctors arrive in under two hours for emergency situations or you can schedule an appointment ahead of time. It costs $99 per visit without insurance or an in-network co-pay.
On Tuesday, the Santa Monica-based company announced it has raised $26.9 million in Series A funding led by Thomas Tull’s Tull Investment group, bringing the total funding to $40 million. Other investors joining the round include Breyer Capital and Qualcomm (QCOM) Executive Chairman Paul Jacobs.
“Heal is uniquely positioned to assume the role of the go-to health care option in America. They have the leadership team, technology innovation and vision required to contribute to the transformation of the health care industry,” Tull said in the press release.
The husband and wife co-founders came up with the idea in October 2014, when their then-7-month-old son was sick on a Friday afternoon.

“We couldn’t get a hold of his pediatrician so we went to the emergency room and waited there from 4 p.m. to 11:15 p.m. Turns out my son was OK. But when we were on the way home, my wife turned to me and said there has to be a better way,” one of the founders, Nick Desai, told Yahoo Finance.
Desai and his wife, Dr. Renee Dua — who is board-certified in nephrology, hypertension and internal medicine, and served as chief of medicine at Valley Presbyterian and Simi Valley Hospitals in California — embarked on a journey to reinvent primary and preventive care.
Since April 1 of this year, Heal has seen 8,500 patients. Recruiting mostly through referrals, the company employs 15 full-time doctors and 45 long-term contractors. Desai says he understands that Heal can’t fix medicine for patients unless they help doctors first.
“The reality of the health care system is that primary care physicians are unhappy,” he said. “Ironically, this dissatisfaction exists because doctors don’t have enough time to practice quality medicine.”
With Heal, a medical assistant drives doctors to a patient’s home. Through a tablet-based record system, physicians spend the car ride analyzing a patient’s history through the digitized system.

Currently available in California’s Los Angeles, Orange County, San Francisco, Silicon Valley and San Diego, Heal accepts all the preferred provider organization (PPO) health insurance plans, including Aetna (AET), UnitedHealthCare (UNH), Cigna (CI) and Anthem Blue Cross (ANTM).
“We want to offer services that are patient-friendly and improve health care outcomes,” Desai said. “More and more people have insurance because of Obamacare, but it’s the first time they don’t know how to find and use services or if they don’t want to wait for a doctor they just go to the emergency room, which costs more money for both the patient and the system.”
Heal’s mission is akin to that of a bevy of other health care startups that have served specific regions. Doctors Making Housecalls operates in North Carolina. Ashton Kutcher-backed Pager operates in New York City. Dose Healthcare was started by an emergency medicine physician in Nashville. Despite regional competition, none have expanded nationally. Desai thinks Heal is equipped to do so.
With the funding, Desai says he wants to be in every corner of California and serve more patients. Heal will also begin accepting Medicare next month, and it will extend into 10 new markets in 2017.
“From February to November, we’ll be entering one new market a month,” he says.
Of course, the landscape for certain providers isn’t looking so bright, with Aetna, UnitedHealth and Humana exiting 11 of 15 state exchanges next year.
Acknowledging that local knowledge is critical (he and Dua grew up, were educated and have spent their entire adult lives in California), Desai said he and his team need to fully grasp the regulatory market and leverage existing networks to succeed. He’s optimistic that people are desperately looking for an alternative to the health care options typically available to them.
“Health care delivery is very fragmented,” he said. “We’re up against the system but there are a lot of players.”
Additionally, he wants to participate in the next wave of biometric product development.
“We want to reinvent the business process of medicine and we’re seeing that a patient’s home environment is critical to precision medicine,” he said.
By partnering with diagnostics companies, Heal aims to develop intelligent software to create more accurate treatment plans.
And Desai is practicing what he preaches. His now 2 ½-year-old son gets everything from his check-ups to his vaccinations from a Heal doctor. They haven’t taken him to a doctor’s office in the past year.

By Melody Hahm

UK Rag Trade shows steepest sales dip in seven years

(qlmbusinessnews.com via uk.reuters.com – – Mon, 17 Oct, 2016) London, UK – –

Britain's fashion market has suffered its steepest decline in sales since 2009 as consumers increasingly spend their money elsewhere, according to industry data published on Monday.

Retail industry executives including Next's (NXT.L) chief executive, Simon Wolfson, reckon there has been a cyclical move away from spending on clothing back into areas that suffered the most during the economic downturn, such as eating out and travel.

Researcher Kantar Worldpanel said data for the year to Sept. 25 showed that UK fashion has seen four months of consecutive sales decline, with nearly 700 million pounds lost from the value of the market from this time last year.

It said June's decline of 0.1 percent was the first monthly contraction in six years.

“Fashion retailers are still following the same patterns of over-buying and deep discounting and consumers are increasingly reluctant to pay full price,” said Glen Tooke, consumer insight director at Kantar Worldpanel.

“Most recently the decline has been driven by falling frequencies of buying, giving retailers fewer opportunities to encourage shoppers to part with their cash.”

Earlier this month a survey from BDO, the accountancy and business advisory firm, said Britain's fashion retailers suffered a slump in sales in September as unseasonably warm weather deterred sales of autumn and winter collections.

(Reporting by James Davey; Editing by Greg Mahlich)