How Blue Bottle Went From A Coffee Cart To A $700 Million Valuation

Source: CNBC

Blue Bottle Coffee offers drip coffee that costs roughly $5 per cup at more than 75 cafe locations around the world. The company touts its high-quality single-origin, freshly roasted artisanal beans. Based on Nestle's 2017 purchase of a majority stake in Blue Bottle the latter has a valuation of more than $700 million.

Before he founded Blue Bottle, James Freeman was a struggling classical musician roasting his own fresh beans as a hobby. Since he was obsessed with drinking the freshest cup of coffee he could find he purchased raw, green coffee beans before heating them himself. Freeman felt that most retail coffee chains over-roasted their beans.

A Day in the Life of Property Magnets – Grant and Elena Cardone

Source: Grant Cardone

Here's a day in the life of me and my wife Elena Cardone. A private plane from Miami to Houston, real estate shopping, then a trip to Las Vegas to speak at Thrive. How do you build an empire? You're either creating or destroying something every day! If you don't want to do something, but know you should, do it anyway. No matter how you feel. That's how you fast track your way to success .

Dan Pena From $820 To Billionaire

Source: WingsLikeEagles

“Find something you love, and find something that can change a billion lives.”

Dan Peña is by far one of the most eccentric American businessmen. Dwelling in the 550 year old Guthrie Castle in Scotland, Dan was originally known for turning $820 into $450 million in the oil business in the 1980s. Since then he has taken a break from the business world to focus on mentoring elite executives and boasts a net worth creation of $50 billion. As Ripley used to say, “Believe it, or not.”

ROBERT KIYOSAKI – Rich Dad, Poor Dad – How To Invest In Yourself

Source: LR

Robert Kiyosaki is an entrepreneur, educator, and investor, best known as the author of Rich Dad Poor Dad—the #1 personal finance book of all time. He has challenged and changed the way tens of millions of people around the world think about money. And he has become a passionate and outspoken advocate for financial education.

How India Became The Fastest Growing Economy in The World

Source: CNBC

Indian voters are deciding on their next prime minister and one key issue that could sway voters is how much Prime Minister Narendra Modi has done with the country's economy.

However, the country is facing a few obstacles. A few years ago, Prime Minister Modi, promised to add 10 million jobs to help boost the economy. That hasn't really happened.

The unemployment rate now sits at a 45-year high. And GDP per capita, which is a measure of wealth across a country, lags behind rivals like China by a wide margin.

Why EV Start-Up Rivian Has Received $1B Investment From Amazon and Ford

Source: BI

Rivian is an up and coming startup company building high-performance electric adventure vehicles. So far the company has received investments from Ford and Amazon totaling over $1 billion. The company has progressed so much by making business decisions no other EV startup is making.

Sweetgreen the restaurant world’s first “unicorn,” valued at over $1 Billion

Source: CNBC

Sweetgreen is now the restaurant world's first “unicorn,” valued at over $1 billion. Started by three college friends out of their dorm room at Georgetown University, the salad company has 91 locations with more in the works and is vying to become the digital food platform of the future.

UK’s watchdog ban on ‘Harmful’ gender stereotypes in adverts comes into force

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Fri, 14th June 2019) London, Uk – –

A ban on adverts featuring “harmful gender stereotypes” or those which are likely to cause “serious or widespread offence” has come into force.

The ban covers scenarios such as a man with his feet up while a woman cleans, or a woman failing to park a car.

The UK's advertising watchdog introduced the ban because it found some portrayals could play a part in “limiting people's potential”.

It said it was pleased with how advertisers had responded.

The new rule follows a review of gender stereotyping in adverts by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) – the organisation that administers the UK Advertising Codes, which cover both broadcast and non-broadcast adverts, including online and social media.

The ASA said the review had found evidence suggesting that harmful stereotypes could “restrict the choices, aspirations and opportunities of children, young people and adults and these stereotypes can be reinforced by some advertising, which plays a part in unequal gender outcomes”.

“Our evidence shows how harmful gender stereotypes in ads can contribute to inequality in society, with costs for all of us. Put simply, we found that some portrayals in ads can, over time, play a part in limiting people's potential,” said ASA chief executive Guy Parker.

‘Stereotypes'

Blogger and father of two Jim Coulson thinks the ban is a good idea. He dislikes adverts that perpetuate stereotypes about dads being “useless”.

“It's the small things though that build up, and the small things are what inform the subconscious,” he told the BBC.

“That's the problem… that adverts rely on stereotypes. We know why they do it, because it's easy. “

But columnist Angela Epstein disagrees, and thinks that society has become “over-sensitive”.

“There's a lot of big things we need to fight over – equality over pay, bullying in the workplace, domestic violence, sexual harassment – these are really big issues that we need to fight over equally,” she told the BBC.

“But when you chuck in the fact that women are doing the dishes [in advertisements], it's not in the same sphere. When we lump it all together and become desensitised, we devalue those important arguments we need to have.”

‘Lack of diversity'

As part of its review, the ASA brought together members of the public and showed them various adverts to gauge how they felt about how men and women were depicted.

One of them was a 2017 television advert for Aptamil baby milk formula, which showed a baby girl growing up to be a ballerina and baby boys engineers and mountain climbers.

The ASA found some parents “felt strongly about the gender based aspirations shown in this advert specifically noting the stereotypical future professions of the boys and girls shown.

“These parents queried why these stereotypes were needed, feeling that they lacked diversity of gender roles and did not represent real life.”

At the time it was released, the campaign prompted complaints but the ASA did not find grounds for a formal investigation as it did not break the rules.

However, Fernando Desouches, managing director of marketing agency New Macho, which specialises in targeting men, said this was an example of a past advert that would not pass the new ASA legislation.

He said it showed how easy it can be for “deeply entrenched views on gender to come through in an ad that purports to be caring and nurturing of future generations.” He was “unsurprised it generated a backlash”.

Other situations likely to fall foul of the new rule include:

  • Adverts which show a man or a woman failing at a task because of their gender, like a man failing to change a nappy or a woman failing to park
  • Adverts aimed at new mothers which suggest that looking good or keeping a home tidy is more important than emotional wellbeing
  • Adverts which belittle a man for carrying out stereotypically female roles

However, the new rules do not preclude the use of all gender stereotypes. The ASA said the aim was to identify “specific harms” that should be prevented.

So, for example, adverts would still be able to show women doing the shopping or men doing DIY, or use gender stereotypes as a way of challenging their negative effects.

The ASA outlined the new rules at the end of last year, giving advertisers six months to prepare for their introduction.

Mr Parker said the watchdog was pleased with how the industry had already responded.

The ASA said it would deal with any complaints on a case-by-case basis and would assess each advert by looking at the “content and context” to determine if the new rule had been broken.

The ecommerce entrepreneur Gretta Van Riel who went from $0 to $600K per month Selling Tea at 22 Years Old

Source: Foundr Magazine

Within just 6 months of starting her first ecommerce business, it was generating $600,000 USD per month (without funding or investment). She was then instrumental in launching another ecommerce business generating $100,000 USD on the first day. Since then, Gretta has repeated this unique framework for four different businesses and niches, turning each into a multimillion dollar success story. She has seen million dollar sales days for her online stores and just celebrated 5 years since she started her first successful ecommerce store in her kitchen (and yes, it's still going strong!).

Palm Beach: America’s first “gated community.”

Source: CBS

The first thing you should know about Palm Beach is that it's an island (unto itself) – the most exclusive town in America, and (according to writer Laurence Leamer) America's first “gated community.” Mo Rocca takes a tour of the city that rose from Florida's tropical wilderness, which today features one of the richest commercial strips in America, and is home to Mar-a-Lago, the “Winter White House” resort of President Donald Trump.



Aliko Dangote: The Nigerian Billionaire’s Top 10 Rules For Success

Source: Evan Carmichael

He's a Nigerian billionaire, who owns the Dangote Group, which has interests in commodities. His company operates in Nigeria and other African countries. As of January 2015, he had an estimated net worth of US$18.6 billion. He's Aliko Dangote and here are his Top 10 Rules for Success.