Inside Rolls Royce An iconic Symbol of Excellence

Source: Documentary House 2.0

It is an icon, a symbol of excellence, a symbol of empire. It brings to mind the faded glory of the aristocracy and yet, today’s aspirants to wealth and position still seek to own a “Rolls.” To many, there is nothing like a Rolls. They say Rolls-Royce is more than just a car. To them it simply means, the best. If someone says that something is “the Rolls Royce of anything,” we know immediately that it is expensive but probably the ultimate. As we trace the storied development of the company founded by Henry Royce and Charles Stewart Rolls, we'll see how Rolls-Royce Motorcars grew to represent the best in the world.

How extreme frugality allowed these people to retire in their 30s

Source: PBS

Eschewing consumer culture, Pete Adeney, also known as Mr. Money Mustache, practices an extreme frugality that allowed him to retire at age 30. Avoiding car use, DIYing and investing in stock market index funds are among the tactics he and his fellow F.I.R.E. (Financial Independence Retire Early) devotees espouse. Paul Solman reports from Colorado in this installment of “Making Sense.”

Jim Rohn – “True Happiness is not contained in what you get, happiness is contained in what you become”

Source: Habits of the wealthy


About Jim Rohn : Emanuel James Jim Rohn (September 17, 1930 – December 5, 2009) was an American entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker. Jim Rohn's rags to riches story played a large part in Jim Rohn's work, which influenced others in the personal development industry. Emanuel James Jim Rohn was born in Yakima, Washington, to Emanuel and Clara Rohn. Jim Rohn's owned and worked a farm in Caldwell, Idaho, where Jim Rohn grew up as an only child. Jim Rohn started Jim Rohn's professional life by working as a stock clerk for department store Sears. Around this time, a friend invited Jim Rohn's to a lecture given by entrepreneur John Earl Shoaff. In 1955, Jim Rohn joined Shoaff's direct selling business AbundaVita as a distributor. In 1957, Jim Rohn resigned Jim Rohn's distributorship with AbundaVita and joined Nutri-Bio, another direct selling company. It was at this point that the company's founders, including Shoaff, started to mentor Jim Rohn. After this mentorship, Jim Rohn built one of the largest organizations in the company. In 1960 when Nutri-Bio expanded into Canada, Shoaff and the other founders selected Jim Rohn as a vice president for the organization.

The billionaire who turned a small business in a shed into the biggest electronics operation on the planet

Source: Bloomberg

Foxconn is known for being the biggest assembler of iPhones. Terry Gou is the chairman and largest shareholder of Foxconn. He's also one of Taiwan's richest men. This is the story of how Gou turned a small operation in a shed into the biggest electronics operation on the planet. Now he's building a $14.5 billion factory in Wisconsin.

Sian Gabbidon crowned Lord Sugar’s Apprentice 2018

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Mon, 17th Dec 2018) London, Uk – –

Swimwear designer Sian Gabbidon has been chosen as the winner of The Apprentice 2018 by Lord Sugar.

The 26-year-old, from Leeds, beat nut milk entrepreneur Camilla Ainsworth, 22, to win a £250,000 investment from Lord Sugar in her swimwear firm.

She said she was “absolutely over the Moon” and that the possibilities of their partnership were “endless”.

Lord Sugar said although it was a “crowded market” Gabbidon was “an expert” in her field.

It is Lord Sugar's first investment in a fashion business in the show's history.

Gabbidon said on Instagram that it had been a “rollercoaster” and she was “overwhelmed” but “very excited”.

She had predicted her victory in her audition, saying: “When Lord Sugar picks me as his business partner, we're gonna be in there like swimwear and we're gonna make a massive splash in the business”.

“I love what I do, I love fashion, and he's all about business – so to put us together is just going to be ridiculous, the possibilities are endless,” she said.

Runner-up Ainsworth said she would have loved to win, but had to give herself credit for being the youngest finalist in the history of the show.

In the final, Ainsworth and Gabbidon were joined by their former Apprentice colleagues in an intensive three-day challenge where they had to create a new brand for their company, produce an advert for the London Underground and edit a television advert.

After bringing their business plans to life, the finalists had to pitch it to a room full of industry experts and Lord Sugar at London's City Hall.

Afterwards, they all met in the boardroom where Gabbidon was crowned the winner.

“I think we do have the best two, there's no question of it,” said Lord Sugar before making his decision.

“I find you a big risk, a very, very big risk,” he told Ainsworth, while acknowledging she had chosen a “growing market”.

Announcing Gabbidon as the winner, he said she had “a great aptitude and a talent for design”.

Following the final, previous Apprentice winners tweeted their congratulations to the swimwear designer.

Viewers on Twitter also sent their congratulations, but some were divided on who they wanted to see crowned the winner.

Almost eight million people tuned into last year's final of The Apprentice where Sugar pulled out the ultimate plot-twist by partnering up with both finalists, Sarah Lynn and James White.

Controversial Billionaire Yusaku Maezawa to be Elon Musk’s First Moon Tourist

 

Source: Bloomberg

Retail tycoon Yusaku Maezawa has made billions by ignoring Japanese cultural norms and grabbing publicity through increasingly controversial stunts. Now, Elon Musk's SpaceX is sending him to the moon.

 

 

Winners Mindset – Best Motivational Video


Be Inspired

Living a life of excuses can have very serious and lasting consequences. Not only will excuses prevent you from reaching your full potential, but people around you will also hold you back from recognizing opportunities, talents and skills you might have, to help you overcome your problems.

 

 

Freed of London Make Historical Move With Brown Ballet Shoes For The First Time In The UK

Youtube/Joan Sellers

Brown ballet shoes are to be made for the first time in the UK in a move hailed as “historic” for diversity. Dancers from minority ethnic backgrounds can now get pointe shoes in both bronze and brown instead of traditional pink to match their skin tone. The footwear is made by Freed of London – Britain's oldest manufacturer of ballet kit. Cassa Pancho, founder and artistic director of Ballet Black, a professional company of black and minority ethnic dancers, hailed the news as marking an “historic moment” in British ballet.

 

 

A Tour of The World’s Most Luxurious VIP Airport Terminal

Sam Chui

A tour of the world's most luxurious VIP Airport Terminal in Dubai South. Check out the amazing facility of JetEx and one of a kind duty free shopping such as BMW and Rolls Royce sports cars! This video gives you an insight how the rich and VIP travels.

 

The Art Of Becoming A killer Negotiator in Nine Steps

(qlmbusinessnews.com via telegraph.co.uk – – Sat, 22 Sept 2018) London, Uk – –

Negotiating is something we do on a daily basis, be it at work or at home, and is key to ensuring that you always get the best outcome.

According to the late soul singer Marvin Gaye, “Negotiation means getting the best of your opponent”. But negotiation is an art form that is hard to learn and even harder to master.

We've cherry-picked the most powerful tips for becoming a killer negotiator from Quora, the global question and answer network, to find the secret to getting what you want, every time.

1. Always be prepared
“You need to know as much as you can about the other party/topic/project”, explains Sebastian Amieva, a Quora poster who studied negotiation at Harvard Law School.

Fellow Quora poster Margaret Weiss agrees: “Negotiation is about the other party. It's not about you. You can be the best orator in the world – concise, convincing, eloquent – but if the other party cannot relate to you, regardless of your skills, all of those efforts will be in vain.

“The first thing that negotiators do is research their target audience – and based on the information gathered they adjust their pitch to the exact expectations of the other party. This research is what makes a person a good negotiator: the ability to connect to the needs of the other party, and the ability to speak on the same level.”

2. Remain objective
“A mediator must remain objective in discussing issues, even if they dislike some or all of the parties to the negotiation,” says Shane Dempsey, a professional mediator.

Even if you don't like the other parties involved, they should still receive professionalism and courtesy, Ms Dempsey added.

3. Use open-ended questions

According to behavioural science expert Craig Dos Santos, asking open-ended questions is key to negotiating, as it gets the other party talking, “so you can learn more, listen more, and figure out what is driving their thought process”.

“Don't ask questions that start with verbs. “Is that okay?” or “Is the budget proposal correct?” Instead try, “How can we improve this?” or “What changes are needed in the budget proposal?”

4. Don't talk too much
By listening more and talking less, negotiators are able to develop a detailed understanding of the needs of the other person.

“The best negotiator that I've known really didn't talk much,” says Yishan Wong, a former chief executive of Reddit whose Quora post on this topic received almost 2,000 upvotes (or “likes”). “He would just ask you questions about what you wanted and listen really carefully.

“People like to talk about what they want and how they feel about it, so they will tend to go on about things if you let them, and he would just let them do that, all the while listening really carefully.

“He would then go away and figure out how to structure the right deal given the resources/abilities at his (or his company's) disposal, and then present them with a deal,” adds Mr Wong. “He didn't need to talk them into it very much, the key seemed to be all about getting into their heads to find out what kind of deal would be most appealing to them.”

5. Force a ‘no' out of your opponent
Mr Dos Santos has a contrarian approach to negotiation. “When you get a ‘no' you have a real answer,” he says. “Being open to (or even inviting) ‘no' is respecting the other side's ability to make a choice. Often yes answers are actually maybes, and they also don't give you information about the boundaries.

“A simple example: someone offers you £95,000, and you ask for £100,000. They say yes. What did you learn? Could you have asked for more? Should you have asked for something else instead?”

Mr Dos Santos claims that the key to asking the harder questions is being able to bring the person back after ‘no'. “Hard questions introduce tension, and your ability to ask them is gated by your ability to reduce that tension by making the other party feel okay/better,” he says. “Notice the focus on emotion.”

6. Give them options
“Humans have a basic need for autonomy. If our ability to choose is restricted, we rebel,” claims Quora poster Brandon Villano.

“Come up with a few options that are favorable to you, and give them the opportunity to select which one they want. This is very powerful because it makes them feel much more in control (while still satisfying your requirements).

“All in all remember it's a win/win situation you are looking to achieve. You want the other party to feel good about the decision they made and happy that they got what they wanted. If you always come out on top with others feeling cheated, you build a bad reputation and this will make others wary of attempting a transaction with you.”

7. Fake empathy
“The other day a friend pinged me because he wanted a discount on an Airbnb rental,” writes Mr Dos Santos. “It was £2,700 and he wanted it for £2,000. Instead of just offering £2,000, which would mean the owner would have to fight an internal battle over what the place was actually worth, I helped him over-empathise with her.”

The friend drafted an email that read: “The place is gorgeous. I loved the photos and I would love to stay there. It's probably worth more than £2,700 and your price is a steal. However, I'm on a company budget, and I can only pay £2,000.”

This is a counter-intuitive approach: this individual has admitted that the asking price is fair and even said that it might be worth more. However, by using emotional manipulation, he got his deal. “He didn't fight her on valuation, and he made her feel good about the place,” says Mr Dos Santos. “He got the discount. £700 in 10 minutes with one email.”

8. Fix a deadline for negotiations to end

Rather than allowing negotiations to go on interminably, fix a reasonable deadline to get the deal done.

“It is very helpful to have some deadline/expiration date to create a forcing function for the negotiators,” says entrepreneur Kacy Qua. “If you are negotiating on behalf of an organisation and you come out of the negotiation too quickly, your side will think you didn't put up a strong enough fight.

“Having a deadline also provides a point from which you can work backward, so that you can time the flow of agreements/proposal rejections.”

9. Volunteer for The Samaritans
“The FBI often trains hostage negotiators by sending them to crisis/suicide hotlines for a year,” says Mr Dos Santos. “This is a process I'm currently going through myself. Why? Because it's the ultimate training ground for focusing on someone's emotions, and moving them from A to B. And it's hugely rewarding work.”

By Sophie Christie

 

 

This exceptional make-up artist’s surreal work made her an Instagram hit

 

(qlmbusinessnews.com via bbc.co.uk – – Sat, 15th Sept 2018) London, Uk – –
Make-up artist Romanie-Jade Tulloch has amassed nearly 160,000 Instagram followers on her account with her surreal designs.

The 19-year-old, from Nottingham, said the artworks can take up to five hours to create.

Ms Tulloch, now an “Instagram influencer”, was awarded a Prince's Trust loan to get her career as a make-up artist off the ground.

At the same time her social media page “blew up”, she said, and now hopes to turn her hobby into a full-time job.